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J. Caleb Mozzocco

Trinity War Correspondence, Week Four: There’s No ‘Eye’ In ‘Team’ [Spoilers]

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Welcome back, Trinity Warriors! The Justice League Vs. Justice League Vs. Justice League conflict that is Trinity War is back in full force after a few week's downtime, and thus so are we.

What terrible event could cause three superhero teams with almost identical names to do battle with one another? The pale, purple-clad, villainous community organizer The Outsider and a gun-toting version of the mythological Pandora (a card-carrying member of "The Trinity of Sin") both had designs on the Justice League: Outsider wanted to destroy them to take over the world or whatever, while Pandora wanted the pure-of-heart Superman to re-open her magic box and thus re-imprison the sins of the world. Later, Shazam (nee Captain Marvel) flew to Khandaq on a personal errand and caused a violent international incident. During the stand-off between Shazam, the Justice League and Amanda Waller's hand-picked Justice League of America, Superman seemingly murdered the hero Doctor Light. Thinking Pandora and her magic box were the key to Superman's unusual outburst, Wonder Woman recruited the occult Justice League Dark to help her track Pandy down. Meanwhile, Batman and Trinity of Sin member the Phantom Stranger have their own ideas, as do Superman and the Question, the third component of the Trinity of Sin, who believes the villainous mind-manipulator Doctor Psycho may have been behind the Man of Steal's murderous actions.

Three Justice Leagues! Three heroes leading them! Three capital-S Sinners messing things up! And three chapters down, with three more to go in ComicsAlliance's Trinity War Correspondence!

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Trinity War Correspondence, Week Three: Batman Forgets To Ask Nicely and The British and The Bold Team-Up [SPOILERS]

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The story so far? When the hero Shazam entered Khandaq in order to spread the ashes of his fallen enemy Black Adam in the sands of the villain's home country, the Justice League (Superman, Batman, Wonder Woman, those guys) sprang into action, hoping to avoid an international incident by kicking Shazam out of Khandaq. At the same time, the Justice League of America, a team of second-stringers assembled by the government agency specifically for the task of taking down the other Justice League, arrive with the same idea.

In the midst of all the arguing that ensues, Superman suddenly loses control and uses his heat-vision to kill Dr. Light, a member of the rival of America League. Superman surrenders himself and is imprisoned by Amanda Waller, leader of the ARGUS (Strategic Hazard Intervention Espionage Logistics Directorate) and the of America squad, and all the Leaguers convene to try and figure out what exactly what happened between Superman's eyeballs and Dr. Light's face.

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Trinity War Correspondence, Week Two: Superman Re-Chained [SPOILERS]

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When we last left our heroes of the Justice League and the Justice League of America in Justice League #22 -- the initial chapter of the Trinity War crossover between DC Comics' three Justice League titles (and a few other tie-in comics) -- the two Leagues were facing off over a literal line in the sand in the deserts of Khandaq. And then stuff got real, when Superman heat-visioned Dr. Light's face clean off, killing the newest recruit to the JLA in the process. That act was like a bell ringing at a boxing match, and so everyone came out of their respective corners fighting (Except for Shazam, who was sitting in a hole in the sand, watching the two Leagues fight all around him). And that's where we pick up in Trinity War's second chapter.

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Trinity War Correspondence, Week One: Life, Death and Maybe-Death [SPOILERS]

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What is Trinity War? A long-teased, long-foreshadowed and long-hyped DC Comics crossover event story devised by the company's most popular and most influential (and most handsome, to hear some tell it) writer, Geoff Johns. The story prominently features Pandora, the mysterious, sometimes glowing lady with the hood who created The New 52iverse in the concluding chapter of Johns and Andy Kubert's 2011 event series Flashpoint, and subsequently appeared in all 52 first issues of DC's relaunched superhero line. As such, Trinity War may finally explain what exactly The New 52 is really all about (aside from a whimsical preoccupation with the number of weeks in a year and a questionable predilection for Nehru collars).

What does the "Trinity" in the title refer to? DC usually uses that word to refer to their "Big Three" heroes: Superman, Batman and Wonder Woman. Will they be going to war with one another? Over what? (Maybe romance? You know, Superman and Wonder Woman are dating now, but in the old universe she and Batman dated for, like, an issue of JLA sooooo...). Could the title refer to the "Trinity of Sin," a trio of cosmic wrongdoers including Pandora, The Phantom Stranger and The Question? Is the titular trinity a reference to the three Justice Leagues (Of America, Dark and Original Recipe)? Are they gonna fight?

After more than a year-and-a-half of waiting, we finally found out when Trinity War kicked off in earnest with this week's Justice League #22 and we're going to tell you all about in the first installment of ComicsAlliance's Trinity War Correspondence!

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Can’t Have A Crossover Without A Corpse: Killing Characters From ‘Identity Crisis’ To ‘Trinity War’

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The practice of human sacrifice is as ancient as human civilization and has been practiced variously by various cultures, but most often to pacify gods or nature in the same manner of animal sacrifices. For example, maidens being tossed into volcanoes to keep them from erupting, or victims being buried at the foundations of castles, temples or bridges to protect the constructions from ruin.

We're way past human sacrifice now, of course, but fictional character sacrifice? Today's super-comics creators seem rather devoted to that particular ritual, with many an "event" story arc beginning with the death of a character, as if they were being sacrificed to bless the ensuing narrative.

The latest example is DC Comics' three-book Trinity War crossover, which begins in earnest this week but has been slowly ramping up in several books, most notably Justice League of America, where one of the publisher's oldest and best-known characters was seemingly killed recently.

Be warned, for below there are spoilers for stories as old as 2004's Identity Crisis and as recent as Justice League of America #5.

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‘Lego Batman: The Movie – DC Super Heroes Unite’ Is A World’s Finest Team Up Tale [Review]

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It's a testament to how well-made the video game Lego Batman 2: Superheroes Unite is that large chunks of the "story" scenes can be repurposed and matched with new material so seamlessly that it's difficult to tell that any part of the new direct-to-DVD movie Lego Batman: The Movie -- DC Superheroes Unite was ever intended for anything other than a slick computer-animated movie.

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Lucy Knisley’s ‘Relish’ Is A Satisfying Comics Meal

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The front cover of Relish: My Life in the Kitchen, the new memoir by Lucy Knisley of French Milk fame, bears a pretty killer blurb from Alison Bechdel, whose years of Dykes to Watch Out For and her breakout hit Fun Home have made her something akin to the grand dame of memoir comics: "Step aside, Joy of Cooking."

Bechdel's blurb may be more braggadocio than brass tacks. Irma S. Rombauer's iconic, seminal cookbook isn't going anywhere,

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‘Nemo: Heart of Ice’ Is ‘The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen’, Streamlined [Review]

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There's a downside to being a fictional character in heroic literature, aside from being beholden to the whims of an author or the deadly danger a character is so often subjected to. The role requires a certain remove from the rest of humanity, and warm, reciprocal relationships with others. To s

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‘The Art of Betty and Veronica’ Takes a Historical View of Comics’ Frenemy Fashionistas

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It's an age old question...or, at least, a 70-year-old question: Betty or Veronica?

The two female points of the love triangle at the very center of publisher Archie Comics have always formed a sort of either/or dichotomy for those male readers envious of Archie Andrews' predicament, being seemingly forced to choose between two ideal girlfriends of opposite natures. When those male readers ask

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Surrender Yourself To The Siren Song Of Mark Siegel’s ‘Sailor Twain’ [Review]

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In the late 19th century, about the time during which Mark Siegel's new graphic novel Sailor Twain, or, The Mermaid of The Hudson is set, American critics and thinkers started talking about "the Great American Novel," in response to England's dominance of English-language literature.

The Great American Novel, it was believed, would be one that captured and contained the spirit of the

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