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Best Cosplay Ever (This Week): Assassin’s Creed, Catwoman, Sakura, Nightwing and More

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Although cosplay has been present for decades within the comics, anime, and sci-fi/fantasy fandoms, social media has played an integral role in the thriving communities of costuming that exist, such as Cosplay.com and the Superhero Costuming Forum. Over the years, the cosplay community has evolved into a creative outlet for many fans to establish and showcase some impressive feats of homemade disguise, craftsmanship, and sartorial superheroics at conventions.

In honor of the caped crusaders of the convention scene, ComicsAlliance has created Best Cosplay Ever (This Week), an ongoing collection of some of the most impeccable, creative, and clever costumes that we’ve discovered and assembled into a super-showcase of pure fan-devoted talent.

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Super: Where is the LGBTQ Ms. Marvel?

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Superheroes meant a great deal to my sense of queer identity when I was growing up. The men were rarely drawn as sex symbols, but their athleticism and close male friendships were as close to homoeroticism as the culture allowed me. The presence of strange outsider heroes like Cloak and Dagger, the X-Men, and even DP7, combined with the fantasy of superhuman champions fighting on behalf of the weak and oppressed, made superheroes integral to my sense of self-worth when everything else conspired to tell me I was worthless.

With this new series of columns, 'Super', I'm going to look at some of the questions arising at the intersection of LGBTQ identity and superhero fiction, starting with a really vital one. Why isn't there a gay Ms Marvel?

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Lost in Transition: On ‘Ranma 1/2′ and Owning Your Identity

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Hi, I’m Charlotte Finn. I’m a lifelong comics fan and last year, I admitted to myself that I'm transgender. In this occasional series, I’m going to reassess comics that feature people like me, or close to being like me, and look them over with a fresh set of eyes. Are they good? Are they bad? Are they somehow both, at the same time?

Ranma 1/2 by Rumiko Takahashi is a good manga and deserves its status as a landmark of the medium. It's also not really a transgender manga.

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Comics Alliance Presents ‘Kate or Die’ in ‘Not An Addict!’

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ComicsAlliance Presents “Kate or Die,” a series of exclusive comic strips created by one of our favorite cartoonists, Kate Leth! In this episode, Kate stumbles into the dark and dangerous world of collectible pop culture bobbleheads. She learned it by watching you.

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Category: Culture, Kate or Die, Toys

Best Cosplay Ever (This Week): Draco, Dredd, Cubone, Captain Canuck & More

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In honor of the caped crusaders of the convention scene, ComicsAlliance has created Best Cosplay Ever (This Week), an ongoing collection of some of the most impeccable, creative, and clever costumes that we’ve discovered and assembled into a super-showcase of pure fan-devoted talent.

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Weekender: Kirby Tributes, ‘Wayward’ Words, SPX Guests and More

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The week's over! You did it, and did it in sensational style. But while you've been off working and living and doing all those things that humans do, what have you missed in the world of comics? With Weekender, ComicsAlliance is here to give you a heads-up on some of the stories that you might have overlooked, and to showcase some great writing on comics for you to enjoy over pancakes this weekend.

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Earning the Hindsight Badge: On Jo from ‘Lumberjanes’ #17

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This week, in Boom Studios' Lumberjanes #17 by Noelle Stevenson, Shannon Watters, and Brooke A. Allen, fans got a very pleasant confirmation of a long-rumored background detail on the character of Jo. Spoilers ahead if you're not caught up.

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Keep Living the Stories: ‘Moonshot: The Indigenous Comics Collection’ Celebrates Being Aboriginal

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In 2014, Toronto publisher Alternate History Comics launched a Kickstarter for an anthology of indigenous comics, with the goal of “showcasing the rich heritage and identity of indigenous storytelling.” The resulting anthology, Moonshot: The Indigenous Comics Collection, Volume 1, is now available, and it presents a unique and much needed look into aboriginal storytelling in multiple aspects.

It’s easy, as an indigenous person, to slip into what sounds like hyperbole when discussing a project like this. This is one of the most important comics of the year! But it’s easy for the same reasons that make it hard for any statement to actually be that hyperbolic; the blunt reality of comics as a business and popular medium is that there really aren’t that many aboriginal stories being told, and what few aboriginal characters there are usually employ crude stereotypes. These stereotypes aren’t continued out of any real sense of hatred, but out of the almost complete lack of aboriginal people involved in the telling of these stories.

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Bow to the Queen: Why Can’t the ‘X-Men’ Movies Capture the Majesty of Storm?

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Goddess. Windrider. Queen. Leader. Storm has worn multiple hats during her existence; roles that have aided in her evolution as one of comics’ most significant and abiding heroes. Yet although Storm’s pop cultural significance is great, her characterization has seen glaring inconsistencies from comic book to screen. Fans of the '90s cartoons remember a majestic leader whose long winded monologues became part of her appeal, but fans of the films were subjected to an unimposing and rather useless version of the character.

But what was lost in translation? What is it about Storm that the movies' writers and producers failed to understand?

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Father Of The Year Builds Life-Sized Transformer For His Son And Is Working On A Second

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When you get right down to it, it's not that unusual for kids who see one of the Transformers movies to tell their parents that they want a giant robot of their own. I mean, I don't want to blow anybody's mind here, but that's kind of the point of the entire franchise, to get those impressionable youngsters into toy stores so they can go home with their own Optimus Prime or Megatron. But for one child in China, a toy wasn't going to do it. He wanted the real deal. So his father built him one.

After catching the Transformers movie with his son in August of 2014, Wang Liansheng spent a year building a life-size version of Bumblebee out of discarded auto parts --- and now he's working on Optimus Prime.

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