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The Evolution of Catwoman: Best Catwoman Stories by Decade

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Many of comics’ most popular heroes have been around for decades, and in the case of the big names from the publisher now known as DC Comics, some have been around for a sizable chunk of a century. As these characters passed through the different historical eras known in comics as the Golden Age (the late 1930s through the early 1950s), the Silver Age (the mid 1950s through the late 1960s), the Bronze Age (the early 1970s through the mid 1980s) and on into modern times, they have experienced considerable changes in tone and portrayal that reflect the zeitgeist of the time.

With this feature we’ll help you navigate the very best stories of DC Comics’ most beloved characters decade by decade. This week, we’re taking a look at the best Catwoman comics.

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Tokyopop Is Poised to Return, But Should Creators Take a Chance?

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Tokyopop is back. The manga publisher, known for its rapid rise and subsequent implosion in the early 2000s, announced a new push toward active business at Anime Expo on July 2. Tokyopop founder Stu Levy (also known as DJ Milky) led a panel that unveiled an ad-supported comics app called Pop Comics and unspecified plans to return to manga publishing in 2016.

The response from creators who have been published by Tokyopop was… let’s call it “less than enthusiastic”:

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Proud Stands ‘The Spire’; Here’s How Artist Jeff Stokely Built It [Interview]

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It was clear during their time together working on Six Gun Gorilla for Boom Studios that artist Jeff Stokely and writer Si Spurrier immediately connected as a team. Their sensibilities merged into a captivating, personal whole, creating a wild comics that still felt as intimate as a comic about a gun-slinging gorilla possibly can.

This year the pair have returned with a new series at Boom, The Spire, an epic fantasy that thrives on the rich, beautiful artwork of Stokely and colorist Andre May. The series is at once grand, almighty and filled with character, roving from the top to the bottom of the eponymous tower to look at a large cast of characters living (and dying) within its walls. It's a giant undertaking, and one that Stokely has jumped on with breathtaking skill. We in turn jumped at the opportunity to speak to him about his work on the book.

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At What Cost? Mairghread Scott Talks Magic, Macbeth, And ‘The Third Witch’ [Interview]

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What comes to mind when you think of Shakespeare's Macbeth? There's a good chance the three witches are high on your list, with alll their double, double, toil and trouble. Beyond their brewing, however, they're a relatively anonymous bunch — until now.

Mairghread Scott, with Kelly and Nichole Matthews on art, plans to bring the mysterious three to brilliant new life in The Third Witch, on sale September 2nd from Boom's Archaia imprint. Riata, Cait, and Smertae have been the unseen force behind Scotland's kings for countless years. When a disagreement erupts between the sisters, however, their fell powers threaten to change the course of history. ComicsAlliance sat down with Scott to talk Shakespeare, magic, and music to write witches to.

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Unpacking the Transphobia in ‘Airboy’ #2

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Airboy is a four-issue miniseries written by James Robinson and illustrated by Greg Hinkle, and published by Image Comics. Its premise is that Robinson and Hinkle, portrayed as fictionalized versions of themselves, are tapped to revamp an obscure Golden Age character. Robinson suffers writer's block, which hanging out with Hinkle doesn't help; the two of them wind up injecting, inhaling and eating the equivalent of a small pharmacy and go on a bender. When they awaken, they find that the creation they were tasked to revamp, Airboy, has sprung to four-color life, and he sees much wrong with the world – possibly rightly, possibly wrongly.

So far, so good. It's metafiction, but speaking as someone whose shelves groan under the weight of Grant Morrison and Terry Pratchett, there's nothing wrong with a good metafiction that blurs the line between creation and creator. But there's a dark side to blurring that line, and that dark side is that it makes it difficult to tell where the fictional character ends and the real person's opinions begin – and that's lent an odious air when the opinions ventured in the narrative are wrongheaded and harmful.

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Noelle Stevenson and Todd Casey Introduce ’4 Wizards’ [Exclusive Interview]

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Fans of Noelle Stevenson have been curious to know what she might do next following the print publication of her award-winning webcomic Nimona and her decision to step down as one of the writers of Lumberjanes. Publisher's Weekly answered that question on Thursday afternoon, revealing that Stevenson will team with screenwriter Todd Casey for the fantasy adventure series 4 Wizards from HarperTeen, to be published in 2017.

Stevenson and Casey met at Disney when they were working on the animated series Wander Over Yonder, and it was there that the idea for 4 Wizards first developed. ComicsAlliance spoke to the creators to learn more about the wizards and their world, how the pair collaborate, and why they're drawn to the fantasy genre. Stevenson was also kind enough to share her first character sketches exclusively with ComicsAlliance!

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The Journey to Wakanda: Afrofuturism and Black Panther

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When Marvel announced the Black Panther film slated for a 2018 release, with Chadwick Boseman playing the titular character, a lot of fans lost their cool. Black Panther, an Avengers alum since 1967, represents more than the Marvel Studios movie machine’s first foray into a leading super hero of color.

Hailing from the fictional African nation of Wakanda, Black Panther and his scientifically superior homeland are an example of a sub-genre of fiction in which Africans (and African Americans) display a prowess and understanding of technological and scientific advancement. Some called this Black Sci-Fi, but this fiction is perhaps more commonly called Afrofuturism.

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Filed Under: , Category: Longform, Marvel, Opinion

Dear Storytellers: Gay Characters Aren’t Going to Show Up ‘Organically’ In Your Stories, You Have to Put Them There

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We're nowhere to be found in the Star Trek movies, or the Star Wars movies, or Jurassic Park, or The Fast & The Furious. To the best of my knowledge we're not in Mission: Impossible, or Planet of the Apes, or Die Hard, or The Dark Knight, or Transformers. We're not in Lord of the Rings, despite how it may seem, and we're not obviously in Harry Potter, though the author says we're there. We're not in Spider-Man, and somehow we're not even in the X-Men movies, though they are at least partly about us. We might be in The Hunger Games.
We are in James Bond. Of all the big movie franchises, that's the one that's really taken the time to present a handful of gay or bisexual characters in its fifty year history; but as damaged killers, and as uniquely challenging romantic conquests. And we're definitely not in the Marvel movies. Based on recent comments by Marvel Studios president Kevin Feige, we may not turn up there any time soon. You see, Feige isn't going to force it; he'll find an "organic" way to introduce LGBTQ characters to his fictional world.

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Well, They Can’t All Be Batman: Jon Morris on His ‘League of Regrettable Superheroes’

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The Justice League of America and The Avengers are the top teams in comics, super-groups composed of the most popular, most powerful and most iconic superheroes in their respective publisher's fictional universes. Jon Morris' League is... not that kind of league.

Morris, a graphic designer, cartoonist and writer, has devoted himself to compiling and chronicling the weirdest superheroes from throughout comics history on his blog Gone & Forgotten, which he's maintained since the late 1990s. Those efforts have lead to a new book, The League of Regrettable Superheroes: Half-Baked Heroes From Comic Book History, which features a full 100 of the most spectacular misfires of the 20th century comics industry, from 1939's Bozo The Iron Man to 1997's Maggot, from shoe shill AAU Shuperstar to the compressed air-powered speedster Zippo. We spoke to Morris about his selection process and what it really means to be "regrettable."

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Miles Morales is Spider-Man in the New Marvel U (But What Does This Really Mean?)

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The New York Daily News revealed on Sunday that Brian Michael Bendis and Sara Pichelli will launch a new ongoing Marvel series starring Miles Morales in the wake of Secret Wars — with the twist that this will be the first series starring Miles to be set in the main Marvel Universe rather than the Ultimate Universe. (Two major universes entered Secret Wars; one will leave.)

While previous Miles Morales titles bore the names Ultimate Comics: Spider-Man and Miles Morales: Ultimate Spider-Man, this book will unsurprisingly forego the now defunct 'Ultimate' branding. More surprisingly, it won't pick up a new adjective in its place. The new Miles Morales title is simply called Spider-Man.

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