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Preacher Ma’am: How Does ‘Until the End of the World’ Hold Up Today?

PreacherMaam-GTT

As someone who thought she was a dude in the late 1990s, Preacher was the comic I looked forward to every month more than any other. As someone who knows she isn’t a dude in the mid-2010s, I’m looking back on this series and examining what still works, what doesn’t work, and what its lasting legacy is.

If Gone to Texas was the fizzle, Until the End of the World is the bang. The second collection, by Garth Ennis and Steve Dillon, with colors by Matt Hollingsworth, letters by Clem Robbins, and covers by Glenn Fabry, includes issues #8 through #17, and it's where Preacher truly takes off for me, all because of the lead-in story, which gives the collection its title.

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Superhero Color Theory, Part IV: The Outliers

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What does your favourite superheroes' colors tell the audience about their personalities? Using the same color theory people use to group-think a corporate logo, or paint their room, we've been exploring what it means to superhero comics.

Last time we mentioned that The Invisible Woman's blue and white is wise, and elemental, but what does invisible mean as a color? The Wasp's one constant through her many costume changes has been her transparent, flighty wings. And while Kitty Pryde, who also can't seem to settle on a costumes (or a name), isn't transparent as a color, she does actually pass through things.

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Cinemautopsy: What Went Wrong With ‘Green Lantern’?

Green Lantern
Warner Bros.

In Cinemautopsy, we look back at a recent, high-profile failure and asks a simple question: What the hell happened? In this installment... a long-running superhero. The megastar lead of another wildly popular comic-book movie. A massive sci-fi epic with an all-star cast. The guy who reinvented James Bond twice. The guy who went on to launch DC’s TV empire. What could possibly go wrong?

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Filed Under: , Category: DC, Longform, Movies

A Superman Super-Fan On Max Landis’ Flawed-Yet-Impressive ‘American Alien’

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Max Landis is a divisive figure in modern pop culture, to say the least. The son of acclaimed director John Landis, he burst on the scene as the writer of the found-footage film Chronicle, about three friends who gain immense superpowers and find their friendships tested. He’s also known for his online rants about how Rey from Star Wars is a Mary Sue, or defending the casting of Scarlett Johansson in Ghost of the Shell.

So he’s a man with opinions who likes to share them. He also recently finished up his first miniseries at DC Comics, Superman: American Alien, backed up by an impressive roster of A-list art talent, including Nick Dragotta, Jae Lee and Jock. The series follows Clark Kent at various points in his life from childhood through to his early days as Superman, and takes a more grounded approach to the Man of Steel, but often skims and bounces off the ground a bit too hard.

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The Case for Paradise Island As Lesbian Utopia [Pride Week]

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The Amazons are queer to begin with. That’s not even up for debate.

And when I talk about the Amazons, I’m talking about the ones in Wonder Woman comics, as originally introduced in 1941 by H.G. Peter, William Moulton Marston, and Marston’s partners and uncredited collaborators, Elizabeth Holloway Marston and Olive Byrne. The idea that Greek Myth and ancient writings are good sources for what DC’s Amazons should be like didn’t really take hold until Brian Azzarello’s run, and it didn’t serve them very well.

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Screen & Page: See You On The Dueling Ground In ‘Revolutionary Girl Utena’ [Pride Week]

Nozumi Entertainment
Nozumi Entertainment

Most anime is adapted from manga, often produced by the manga publisher to raise awareness and sell it overseas. But what about the anime shows or film that go the other way, adapted from the screen to the page? How do those works hold up, and what changes or stays the same? That’s what Screen & Page aims to explore.

For Pride Week, we're hopping in the Wayback Machine and smelling like roses to talk about Revolutionary Girl Utena!

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World Building: Character And Color in Stokely And Spurrier’s ‘The Spire’ [Pride Week]

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With its eighth issue, Si Spurrier and Jeff Stokely's The Spire wrapped up last week, bringing the the series' whodunnit to a satisfying and surprisingly emotional conclusion. Given that it starred one of my favorite queer characters in recent comics, this seemed like a great time to look back over the Boom Studio series and to try to tell you, the lovely ComicsAlliance reader, why those eight issues are worth grabbing hold of as soon as you get the chance.

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We Read To Challenge Ourselves: An Interview With Mariko Tamaki [Pride Week]

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Writer and performance artist Mariko Tamaki is one of the breakout talents of her generation. She recently published the YA novel Saving Montgomery Sole through Roaring Brook Press, and her 2014 original graphic novel This One Summer, co-authored by her cousin Jillian Tamaki, made history last year as the first comics work to win both the prestigious Caldecott Honor for exceptional picture art and the Printz Honor for best Young Adult literature. The book also won an Eisner and an Ignatz!

In recognition of her tremendous success, ComicsAlliance talked with Tamaki for a career-spanning interview about Saving Montgomery Sole, This One Summer, her performance art, and the importance of queer characters and stories in her work --- starting with a look back at Skim, the Tamakis' groundbreaking story of a Japanese-Canadian outsider at a Catholic girls' school.

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Lost in Transition: ‘DC Comics Bombshells,’ And Why the Second World War Is ‘Like This Now’

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“It’s like this now.”

Those four words are about as DC a phrase as one gets in comics, more than any quote from any comic, because they summarize DC’s approach to all of its worlds and all of its continuities: we want it to be like this, so It’s like this now.

It’s why there’s been anywhere from two to five reboots of the universe during the time I’ve been reading comics. It’s why there’s a multiverse, and why any attempt to bury the multiverse never lasts. And that multiverse is how we’ve wound up with Bombshells, the digital-first series based off a collection of statues issued by DC Direct, written by Marguerite Bennett and illustrated by a team that includes Marguerite Sauvage, Wendy Broome, Laura Braga, Stephen Mooney, Ming Doyle, Ant Lucia, and Bilquis Evely.

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The Issue: ‘Generation Hope’ And The Pain Of Being Different [Pride Week]

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One of the most notable things about queer characters in comics, especially in the heart of the superheroic mainstream, is their absence, at least on a textual level. Queer subtext, though? There's plenty of that, whether it's same-sex relationships that read as romantic, or in the use of mutants as a metaphor that can be applied to LGBTQ experiences.

Which brings us to Generation Hope #9, “Better”, by Kieron Gillen and Jamie McKelvie. It's not an issue explicitly about the LGBTQ experience, but it uses the mutant metaphor to tell a standalone story about real-life events that very much are.

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