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Opinion - Page 3

The Last Man On Earth: Should You Be Reading ‘The Autumnlands’?


Kurt Busiek and Benjamin Dewey's Autumnlands is set in a fantasy world that may or may not be the far-off future. Magic is dying, and the humanoid animal members of a highly hierarchical society devise a last-minute plan to bring the savior and progenitor of their world to their present day.

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Tony the Tiger? Why Is Mary Jane Joining the ‘Iron Man’ Cast?


Well, this is weird. Mary Jane Watson, model, nightclub owner, and ex-wife of Peter Parker (it's a fact, you gotta deal with it) is making a transfer to the Iron Man supporting cast in the fourth issue of Brian Michael Bendis and David Marquez's Invincible Iron Man this December. Marvel made the announcement on its website today, declaring that she will take on a new, "unexpected" role.

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Super: Where is the LGBTQ Ms. Marvel?


Superheroes meant a great deal to my sense of queer identity when I was growing up. The men were rarely drawn as sex symbols, but their athleticism and close male friendships were as close to homoeroticism as the culture allowed me. The presence of strange outsider heroes like Cloak and Dagger, the X-Men, and even DP7, combined with the fantasy of superhuman champions fighting on behalf of the weak and oppressed, made superheroes integral to my sense of self-worth when everything else conspired to tell me I was worthless.

With this new series of columns, 'Super', I'm going to look at some of the questions arising at the intersection of LGBTQ identity and superhero fiction, starting with a really vital one. Why isn't there a gay Ms Marvel?

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Hipster God & The Bad Teacher: Should You Be Reading ‘ReCollection’?


In ReCollection, by Ichigo Takano, a man with no positive attributes beyond the physical basics discovers that he’s an amnesiac high school teacher. He’s dating a student in his homeroom class. And he can see God.

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Lost in Transition: On ‘Ranma 1/2′ and Owning Your Identity


Hi, I’m Charlotte Finn. I’m a lifelong comics fan and last year, I admitted to myself that I'm transgender. In this occasional series, I’m going to reassess comics that feature people like me, or close to being like me, and look them over with a fresh set of eyes. Are they good? Are they bad? Are they somehow both, at the same time?

Ranma 1/2 by Rumiko Takahashi is a good manga and deserves its status as a landmark of the medium. It's also not really a transgender manga.

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Entangled in Magic: Should You Be Reading ‘Witchy’?


Ariel Ries's webcomic Witchy is set in a fantasy kingdom where magical strength is decided by hair length. Find yourself born with hair too short, and you're a drain of resources in an ostensibly meritocratic society. If your hair is long enough, you're conscripted into the Witch Guard, which acts as the police force during peace, and the army during war. Find yourself with hair too long, and you're burned to death as a possible threat to the kingdom.

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Thumbnail: Design and the Distillation of Ideas in Mike Del Mundo’s Covers


Comics covers are strange beasts. While comics themselves are sequential art --- pictures arranged in just the right order to tell a story or convey an emotion --- covers freeze that process into a single static image. But Mike Del Mundo's work at Marvel shows that they can be much more than pretty pictures.

You don't need me to tell you that Del Mundo's covers are gorgeous. He's an incredible draftsman with an even stronger sense of design. Covers let him push the latter talent to the fore, dancing through various styles, from stark two-color minimalism to detailed paintings, via pastiches of Escher and Art Deco posters, all depending on what suits this issue best.

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Ask Chris #256: The Inherent Goofiness Of Future Space Teens

Ask Chris #256: Future Space Teens, background art by Curt Swan and Stan Kaye

Q: Do you think it's possible for the Legion of Super-Heroes to work today, or are the trappings too corny? -- @jdkrach

A: My first instinct on this one is to say yes, and not just because the Legion was, for a long time, one of my absolute favorite comics. The entire superhero genre is, after all, full of corny ideas that have become timeless, right down to the fact that the entire thing is built around the idea of a very nice man who came from space and fools everyone into thinking that he's a very nice man from Kansas by wearing a pair of glasses.

But the Legion represents an entirely different question. It's not just the optimism of a bright future and names like "Lightning Lad" that can come off as corny, it's the entire universe that allowed them to exist in the first place --- and for a team that's been rebooted more times than just about anyone else, they sure do seem to have a hard time keeping up.

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Filed Under: Category: Ask Chris, DC, Opinion

The Evolution of Green Arrow: Best Green Arrow Stories by Decade


Many of comics’ most popular heroes have been around for decades, and in the case of the big names from the publisher now known as DC Comics, some have been around for a sizable chunk of a century. As these characters passed through the different historical eras known in comics as the Golden Age (the late 1930s through the early 1950s), the Silver Age (the mid 1950s through the late 1960s), the Bronze Age (the early 1970s through the mid 1980s) and on into modern times, they have experienced considerable changes in tone and portrayal that reflect the zeitgeist of the time.

With this feature we’ll help you navigate the very best stories of DC Comics’ most beloved characters decade by decade. This week, we’re taking a look at the best Green Arrow comics.

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‘If You Don’t Like It, Make Your Own’ Is a Terrible Argument, But A Great Idea

Make your own.
Make your own.

As someone who makes a living writing and editing for the internet, I've gathered quite a collection of terrible arguments from online commentators, ranging from the perennially awful, 'I don't care about this so you shouldn't either,' to the specifically ignorant, 'How would you feel if they made Black Panther white?' But there's one common argument that combines dull wit with frothy anger to such exhausting effect that it deserves special attention; 'If you don't like it, make your own.'

I write about comics, so I'm especially aware of how often the argument is made in response to comics criticism. But I know that it's also used in all other creative fields, from film-making to video game design, and it's an argument without merit in any field. There is the kernel of a good idea behind it; the comic form is open to anyone who wants to make a contribution. But that doesn't mean you have to make comics rather than criticize. If you don't like what you see, there are several good reasons to say so.

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