Scientists like cyborgs. I like cyborgs. It's good to know science and I are on the same page. Still, there's something creepy about insects hardwired to follow the commands of very smart people. Has no one seen Robocop?

Geekologie has the unholy skinny:

"We demonstrated the remote control of insects in free flight via an implantable radio equipped miniature neural stimulating system," the researchers reported in their new paper for Frontiers in Integrative Neuroscience. " The pronotum mounted system consisted of neural stimulators, muscular stimulators, a radio transceiver-equipped microcontroller and a microbattery."

Apparently, the Pentagon-funded research is aimed at controlling the movements of insects via micro-mechanical systems. The applications of this technology could mean a safer tomorrow, or a robo rebellion. Knowing what I know about a beetle's awesome capacity to think, love and feel, our exoskeletoned friends will resist and rise up. It's just a matter of time.

See what there is to see and put your best face forward to the future of robobeetlekind.

This is how it starts!


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