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If The Joker Isn’t Weird Enough, Check Out ‘Gotham By Midnight’: An Interview With Writer Ray Fawkes

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On November 26th, DC releases the first issue of Gotham By Midnight, a new series by Ray Fawkes and Ben Templesmith that blends black magic and police procedurals, and exposes the supernatural shenanigans that go on below the surface of Batman's hometown. Along with recent successes Gotham Academy, Arkham Manor, and the newly-revamped Batgirl, the book is part of a substantial overhaul and expansion of DC's Bat-family of titles under editor Mark Doyle.

ComicsAlliance sat down with writer Ray Fawkes to get some insight on what he and Templesmith have planned for Detective Jim Corrigan -- who longtime DC fans know is the original host of the vengeance of God, the Spectre -- and his shadowy squad of GCPD operatives.

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‘LEGO Batman V. Superman’ Fan Film Is The Only Dark Knight/Man Of Steel Fight You’ll Ever Need

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We're still over a year away from the big-screen debut of the amazingly titled Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice, in which your two favorite DC Comics heroes will be v-ing each other alongside other members of the Justice League, and maybe getting around to fighting an actual supervillain somewhere in hour three, if they have time. If you can't wait, though, I have some good news: BrickNerd Studios has brought you a short film in which the LEGO counterparts of the Dark Knight and the Man of Steel slug it out in brutal combat... for... some reason.

I'm not overselling things when I say that this is the best possible version of this fight that you're likely to see onscreen, and that Hollywood's going to have a hard time topping it in 2016.

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Buy This Book: ‘Batman ’66: The Lost Episode’

Batman '66: The Lost Episode, DC Comics

There are a lot of great things about the Batman '66 ongoing series, but I think my favorite is how it's been expanding the Dutch-angled, pop-art universe of the original TV show beyond its three-season run. There have been new adventures for the show's roster of special guest villains, new locations, and even new characters in the form of additions like the Arkham Institute's Dr. Holly Quinn and the massive, atomic-powered Bat-Robot.

On top of all that, the not-at-all surprising success of the Batman '66 revival has expanded the universe in one of the most interesting ways by finally giving us one of the biggest missed opportunities in the character's history: A full adaptation of Harlan Ellison's unproduced Two-Face story.

I've known that this story was out there for a while because it always comes up in discussions of great superhero stories that never happened, and finally getting to read it in this week's Batman '66: The Lost Episode was a fantastic experience -- not just because the story itself was fun, but because the way it was presented was amazing.

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Jiro Kuwata’s ‘Batmanga’ Is A Superhero Comic Unlike Any You Have Seen

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Readers demand a lot from superhero comics: consistency, continuity, adherence to the rules of the universe, compelling heroes, magnetic villains, satisfying endings, and the list goes on.

But those of us who have been reading for years (if not decades) are chiefly looking for one big thing above all else: novelty. We want to see something we’ve never seen before; characters we recognize as the heroes and villains we love being put into scenarios and settings wholly unlike what’s come in nearly 80 years of superhero comics.

That’s notoriously hard to do. Many times, stories end up being very similar to what’s come before, and when creators do try something new, they elicit complaints from readers who don’t like particular changes or decisions. But what if you could strip away those pressures and build a superhero comic that’s so strange and unique that it’s a must-read?

That’s what Jiro Kuwata’s 1960s Batman comics, currently being republished as the DC Digital Series Batman: The Jiro Kuwata Batmanga, are. A strange combination of classic Batman comics, the 1960s Batman TV-show, Marvel-Age science-based storytelling, mysticism, cartoon physics, Tokusatsu, and of all things, Scooby-Doo, it isn’t like any comic I’ve ever read. It’s endlessly surprising, and I love it.

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LEGO Batman Spinoff Will Explore Every Era of Batman’s Filmography, Will Probably Include Bat-Nipples and Dead Parents

Lego Batman Spinoff
Warner Bros.

We’ve seen Batman envisioned time and again on screens big and small, and yet it took a tiny LEGO version of the character to take us by surprise with Phil Lord and Chris Miller’s hilarious take on the character in this year’s ‘The LEGO Movie.’ Voiced by Will Arnett, this version of Batman lovingly satirized the Caped Crusader. The character was such a hit that we’re getting a spinoff in 2017 ahead of the ‘LEGO Movie’ sequel, and the writers have dropped some details about what we can expect.

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Why Are Christopher Nolan Fans So Intense?

Christopher Nolan
Warner Bros.

The last time Christopher Nolan released a movie, film critics got death threats. That was back in 2012, when Nolan released ‘The Dark Knight Rises,’ and the first writers who dared to stray from the positive consensus about the film received waves of overwhelming backlash. After Marshall Fine published his pan, his site and his page on Rotten Tomatoes were both bombarded with angry comments politely requesting he “die in a fire” and hoping someone would beat him into a coma with a “thick rubber hose.”

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Mondo Offers Die-Cut Vinyl Of Danny Elfman’s ‘Batman: The Animated Series’ Theme

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Mondo, you are killing me with this.

As part of their year-long celebration of Batman's 75th Anniversary, Mondo has produced an art show, posters, and a truly beautiful soundtrack album that sold out of all five designs at San Diego, and now, they're giving me the most compelling reason yet to get into vinyl: a die-cut single of Danny Elfman's theme from Batman: The Animated Series. I definitely do not need this because I don't even own a record player, but y'all... it's shaped like a bat. How can I not get this?

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Ask Chris #220: Catwoman And The Villainous Love Interest

Ask Chris art by Erica Henderson

Q: What are your thoughts on Catwoman and how her role has evolved over time? It's unique, isn't it? -- @spudsfan

A: Here's a warning that you're about to read way too many words on what looks like a simple question: Yes and no.

It's not going to surprise anyone when i say that I love Catwoman as a character, and a lot of that comes from how adaptable she is. In her long history, she's been one of the few characters who's been able to transition from villain to hero and back again, and she has a relationship with Batman that has allowed for both characters to grow in ways that no other character has, or even could. But at the same time, she's probably the single most successful example of a cliché that bugs me to no end: The Villainous Love Interest.

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Filed Under: , Category: Ask Chris, DC, Opinion

Death Of A Thousand Supercuts: Batman’s Parents To Perish On Screen Yet Again In ‘Batman V. Superman’

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It's just not a movie featuring Bruce Wayne/Batman unless you have the death of Bruce Wayne's parents, thus explaining his mopey origins, is it? Zack Snyder would agree, and so would some new set photos from 'Batman vs. Superman,' which confirm that we will see Thomas and Martha Wayne shot to death yet again, just in case you're not sick of seeing that happen. Seriously? Again? Again-again-again?

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Clean Lines And Broken Glass: Why ‘The Batman Adventures’ Is The Best Bat Comic Of The Nineties

The Batman Adventures, DC Comics

Here's something that you already know: Batman: The Animated Series is arguably the single best representation of Batman in the Dark Knight's 75-year history. It boiled down the character to his essentials, creating a beautiful and thrilling version of Batman that was acessible to fans of all ages and still holds up as a high point over twenty years later. Now here's something you might not know: The comic book that was created to go along with the show, The Batman Adventures, was every bit as good as the show.

This week, DC Comics released a collection of the first ten issues by Kelly Puckett, Mike Parobeck, Ty Templeton, Brad Rader, Martin Pasko and Rick Burchett, and that means this is a great time to talk about how that comic is about as close to being perfect, and how it's essential for anyone who wants to read some of the greatest Batman comics ever printed -- including the single best Riddler story ever.

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