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Lady She-Woman: Female Superhero Codenames and Identity

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Monica Rambeau is on her fourth superhero codename. In the pages of Mighty Avengers she's Spectrum, having previously gone by Captain Marvel, Photon and Pulsar. The Captain Marvel identity now belongs to Carol Danvers, also on her fourth codename after Ms. Marvel, Binary and Warbird. Her first codename now belongs to Kamala Khan, the fourth Ms. Marvel after Danvers, Sharon Ventura and Karla Sofen.

But Carol is actually the third woman (and seventh character) to call herself Captain Marvel in the Marvel Universe. The second woman was Phyla-Vell, who was the fourth Captain Marvel after she was the second Quasar, before she was the first Martyr, before she saved herself the trouble of another codename by dying. Oh, those women! They never know who they are!

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Kate Leth and Kelly Sue DeConnick’s Carol Corps Memories [Interview]

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Last week's Emerald City Comicon kicked off, for me, with the Carol Corps Celebration at the Museum of Flight in Seattle, Washington. Hosted by a bevy of nerdy Captain Marvel enthusiasts and featuring some of the finest cosplay I saw all weekend, proceeds from tickets and exclusive merchandise went  to benefit the Girls Leadership Institute. It's a rare thing for fans and creators to celebrate a superhero character in such a thematically specific and highly interactive way -- Carol Danvers is a military pilot, after all, and the new Ms. Marvel is herself a member of the Carol Corps -- and a woman superhero at that. But the event was an absolutely joyful experience that spoke to the good work being done in these comics and readers' enthusiasm for great women heroes (both fictional and real-life).

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‘Ms. Marvel’ #1: Embracing The Paradox [Review]

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James Baldwin once described America as a "country devoted to the death of the paradox." He was right, of course. We're more comfortable seeing things in extremes, in black and white. A person from one culture or background can be instantly labeled as an upstanding citizen, exemplifying everything good about "real America." Superman is from Kansas, not San Francisco.

But if you're from another background, you can be instantly labeled as something else entirely: lazy, entitled, a thug, "Un-American." To many, there are those who fit into a certain label based on where they grew up, what school they went to, what church they attend. To think otherwise, to consider that there is more to us than blanket, largely basely assumptions, isn't as easy. And for many, it's too uncomfortable. It's too much work.

Ms. Marvel #1 stands in stark contrast to that sentiment. Written by G. Willow Wilson and illustrated by Adrian Alphona, each major character introduced in this first issue is a celebration and exploration of the paradox. It is a book full of characters who remind you of people you know, or people you knew. It's a book that's unique, but nonetheless familiar. It is also, by almost any measure, one of the best first issues of a superhero comic in years. And, if we're being honest, it probably needed to be.

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Best Sequential Art Ever (This Week): Adrian Alphona, Jason Masters and Scott Kolins

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The comic book, animation, illustration, pinup, mashup, fan art and design communities are generating amazing artwork of myriad styles and tastes, all of which ends up on the Internet and filtered into ComicsAlliance’s Best Art Ever (This Week). These images convey senses of mood and character — not to mention artistic skill — but comic books are specifically a medium of sequential narratives, and great sequential art has to be both beautiful (totally subjective!) and clear in its storytelling (not so subjective!). The words and the pictures need to work together to tell the story and create whatever tone, emotion and indeed world the story requires. The contributions of every person on a creative team, from the writer to the artist(s) to the letterers, are necessary to achieving a great page of sequential storytelling.

It is the special nature of comic books that we’re celebrating in this recurring feature: Best Sequential Art Ever (This Week).

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Pakistani Women Give Their Thoughts On ‘Ms. Marvel’

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Whenever the subject of cultural representation in media is broached, there's a comment you'll almost always hear: "I don't see what difference it makes." It's a statement made by people who believe it doesn't matter whether or not there are positive representations of minorities in media, a position held largely by those who are so used to having that luxury -- to seeing their culture well represented on television, film, etc. -- on a regular basis, that they have no concept of what it's like to be on the other side. Someone saying "I don't see what difference it makes" to a member of an under represented minority is often, in a sense, being honest: they really don't see the difference, because they've never experienced it.

But there are many who take a far less apathetic position on the topic. Being a woman of color means having positive representations of fictional characters who may share a background or upbringing similar to yours is rare. And if you're a Muslim woman in a post 9/11 world, it's even rarer. With that in mind, journalist Shehryar Warraich approached several Pakistani women to get their take on the upcoming Ms. Marvel, which stars Kamala Khan, a Muslim Pakistani-American teenage girl. The reaction was largely, but not exclusively, positive.

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Filed Under: Category: Culture, Marvel

The ‘Ms. Marvel’ Tumblr: An Inside Look At One Of The Most Important Books Of The Year

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Next month Marvel will release the much anticipated Ms. Marvel #1, the new series from creators G. Willow Wilson and Adrian Alphona, and edited by Sana Amanat. It is a rarity in the industry: you can practically count on one hand the number of titles published at Marvel and DC combined that have starred a woman of color. Further, the new Ms. Marvel -- Kamala Khan -- is a Muslim Pakistani-American teenager, the first Muslim character to star in a monthly solo series at Marvel. As such, the title has received significant attention, and rightfully so; it's obviously early in the year, but it's no stretch to say that this may be the most important comic published in 2014.

And if not the most important, so far I'd say it's the most anticipated. Before the first issue has even hit stands, it has already received the type of media attention seldom afforded a super hero comic, and that type of attention breeds curiosity. With that in mind, Amanat has set up the Ms. Marvel tumblr, which gives people looking forward to the title a peek behind the curtain at the process of putting the book together, as well as explaining a few things you may have missed.

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UPDATE: Some Cool Images From January’s ‘All-New Marvel Now Point One’ Special (But No ‘Inhuman’ Because It’s Postponed Until April)

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Marvel's occasional Point One specials are one-shot comics compiling short stories designed to provide clues to or otherwise tease Marvel Universe events to take place in the months or years to come. Sometimes these events turn out to be capital-E Events, sometimes they're new series. In every case, the Point One books feel maddeningly incomplete but do the job of building anticipation among fans of the characters and creators involved. Based on the preview images released by Marvel on Wednesday, this year's is likely no exception.

Featuring new artwork by Michael Allred, Lee Garbett, Phil Noto, Adrian Alphona, Rags Morales, Steve Pugh with stories by Dan Slott, Al Ewing, James Robinson, G. Willow Wilson, Nick Spencer and Nathan Edmonson, January's All-New Marvel Now Point One comes with signs and portents for next year's Invaders, Silver Surfer, Loki: Agent of Asgard, Avengers World, Black Widow and of course the much anticipated Ms. Marvel.

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Colbert Gets Alarmist About The New Ms. Marvel [Video]

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Stephen Colbert is a noted Marvel fan. He met Spider-Man that one time, he's schmoozed with Marvel Chief Creative Officer Joe Quesada and he's even got Captain America's shield on the set of The Colbert Report. But now he's breaking ranks with the House of Ideas over the new Ms. Marvel, who will be a teenage Muslim named Kamala Khan in a new ongoing series by writer G. Willow Wilson (Cairo) and artist Adrian Alphona (Runaways).

See the video of the faux-ultra conservative pundit's remarks after the jump.

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Marvel Unveils New Ms. Marvel: A Muslim Pakistani-American Teenager

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The New York Times broke news today of a new solo superhero title launching from Marvel early next year -- and this one comes as a welcome change of pace for readers who want to see more diversity in their super-books.

Ms Marvel #1, from writer G. Willow Wilson (Cairo) and artist Adrian Alphona (Runaways), introduces the world to the young Muslim woman who takes on the mantle of Ms. Marvel formerly held by Carol Danvers, the current Captain Marvel. The new Ms. Marvel will be the first Muslim character to get her own ongoing solo series at Marvel, one of a growing number of female solo leads, and the only person of color headlining a solo book in the Marvel Universe.

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The X-Men Episode Guide 2×09: A Rogue’s Tale

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The early ’90s were spoiled for choice when it came to comic book adaptations. Not only was Batman: The Animated Series on the air, but X-Men led Marvel’s push to get on the small screen, diving right into the often convoluted continuity of everyone’s favorite mutants, luring in a generation of fans, and paving the way for cartoons to follow. That’s why we’ve set out to review every single episode of the ’90s X-Men animated series. This week: "A Rogue's Tale," in which Rogue's origin explains everything but her dubious hair choices.

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