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Finding Identity in Warren Ellis & Declan Shalvey’s ‘Moon Knight’ #1[Review]

Moon Knight review

Moon Knight is an oddball in a comics universe peppered with oddballs. A former mercenary brought back from the dead by an Egyptian god to serve as his "fist" of retribution, MK's origin offers a peculiar mix of brutality, insanity, and fantasy.

Those elements have been fundamental to Moon Knight since he first appeared in Werewolf by Night in 1975, created by Doug Moench and Don Perlin. Yet in the hands of successive creative teams these elements have come together in ways that muddy the character, leaving both him and the readers confused about who he is. Now it falls to the new creative team of Warren Ellis and Declan Shalvey to make it all make sense in Moon Knight #1, on sale this week from Marvel.

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Best Comic Book Covers Ever (This Month): January 2014

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Mutants, monsters and warriors adorn our pick of the best covers of January 2014 as Best Comic Book Covers Ever returns. Check out amazing work from Kris Anka and Jared K. Fletcher, Darwyn Cooke, Wes Craig, Rafael Albuequerque and more. We'll even throw in an explosion. Boom! (That wasn't the explosion. We're just excited.)

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Parker, Shaner And Bellaire Team For ‘Flash Gordon’ #1 At Dynamite

Flash Gordon 1 Dynamite Main
Dynamite Entertainment

Ever since Dynamite Entertainment picked up the rights to Flash Gordon from King Features in 2010, the publisher's been rolling out bigger and bigger plans for the Earthling's adventures on the planet Mongo. Following his tenure on the Kings Watch crossover between Flash (ah-ahhhhh), The Phantom and Mandrake the Magician, Jeff Parker is returning to the King of the Impossible for Flash Gordon #1 with artist Evan "Doc" Shaner (Adventures of Superman, Deadpool) and colorist Jordie Bellaire (Pretty Deadly).

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Warren Ellis, Declan Shalvey And Jordie Bellaire To Relaunch ‘Moon Knight’ In 2014

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Created by Doug Moench and Don Perlin, Moon Knight is essentially Marvel's answer to the question "What if Batman were somehow even more psychologically damaged?" That's not a bad premise, frankly, and the character has had some highly regarded writers and artists telling his stories over the years: Moench, Perlin, Bill Sienkiewicz, Chuck Dixon, J.M. DeMatteis, Kevin Nowlan, Brian Michael Bendis, and Mark Farmer, just to name a few.

Yet despite a history of talented creators, Moon Knight has never quite stuck; of the five attempts at a Moon Knight solo series, none have surpassed 60 issues, and the two most recent, launched in 2006 and 2011, only reached 30 and 12 issues, respectively.

But Marvel believes in the character. As such, this morning the publisher announced Moon Knight #1, from acclaimed writer Warren Ellis and artists Declan Shalvey and Jordie Bellaire, to launch next year.

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Three Slaves Are On The Run From 300 Spartan Warriors In Gillen And Kelly’s ‘Three’ #2 [Preview]

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Three, the new miniseries from Kieron Gillen, Ryan Kelly and Jordie Bellaire, was first conceived when, after flipping through the pages of Frank Miller's 300 one night, Gillen had a bit of an angry realization. Miller's popular graphic novel presents the famed warriors of Sparta in a wholly positive, heroic light. Portraying the Spartans purely as heroes, defiant in the face of oppression and persecution while declaring themselves "The only free men the world has ever known," ignores one crucial detail that Gillen screamed into his copy of 300 that fateful night: Spartan warriors hunted slaves. And from this realization, Three was born. While it may not be a total repudiation of Miller's comic, it certainly presents the other side of the story, as readers witness three Helot workers attempt to escape the savage brutality of 300 of the most revered warriors in history.

The end of the first issue revealed the beginning of a mass slaughter. In issue #2, three survivors of the carnage race toward the free city of Messene, with 300 warriors on the their heels. Image Comics has provided ComicsAlliance with a six page preview of the issue, which you can view below.

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DeConnick And Rios Weave Eastern Myths Into A Western Tale In ‘Pretty Deadly’ #1 [Review]

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It’s a rare thrill and kind of a pain when you come across a comic that so stubbornly defies explanation it easily wriggles out from the grasp of any words that you hope to entangle it with. Such is the case with Pretty Deadly, the new Image series by Kelly Sue DeConnick, Emma Ríos, and Jordie Bellaire. I’ve already written and undone four descriptions, wincing every time I found my fingers typing words like “mashup” or “genre-bending,” then leaning on the DEL key to undo my lame attempts to classify such a mercurial book. So let’s try this: Pretty Deadly is an Eastern myth incubated in a Western womb; a story within a story within a story; a dark fairytale about bad men, worse women, and Deadface Ginny, the reaper of vengeance, the daughter of Death. Commence head-banging now.

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‘Nowhere Men’: Science, Drugs, and Rock N’ Roll [Review]

Nowhere Men

Hiatuses kill me. When a great comic book reaches out and touches all those nodes of pleasure in my brain on a regular basis, I come to expect the hit. When that hit suddenly doesn’t come when it’s supposed to, when the next issue is listed in the solicitations only to get pushed back again and again, that expectation grows from an anxious wiggle of electricity in my brain into a full-blown itch, and the longer the wait goes on, the more I want to push my fingers into my head and scratch it. Try as I might, I can’t recall a recent book that’s given me that itch, that’s instigated that want more than Image Comics’ Nowhere Men. Eric Stephenson, Nate Bellegarde, Jordie Bellaire, and Fonografiks are creating one of the most intelligent, experimental, and beautiful comics today, and after an absence of several months, this week it finally returns.

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Best Art Ever (This Week): Breaking Bad, Game Of Thrones, Julie Newmar, Powerpuff Girls & More

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We make a regular practice at ComicsAlliance of spotlighting particular artists or specific bodies of work, but because cartoonists, illustrators and their fans share countless numbers of great images on sites like Flickr, Tumblr, DeviantArt and seemingly infinite art blogs that we’ve created Best Art Ever (This Week), a weekly depository for just some of the pieces of especially compelling artwork that we come across in our regular travels across the Web. Some of it’s new, some of it’s old, some of it’s created by working professionals, some of it’s created by future stars, some of it’s created by talented fans, and some of it’s endearingly silly. All of it’s awesome.

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Best Art Ever (This Week): Mignola’s Rocketeer, Moebius’ Surfer, Chiarello’s Shadow, Kirby’s Streets & More

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We make a regular practice at ComicsAlliance of spotlighting particular artists or specific bodies of work, but because cartoonists, illustrators and their fans share countless numbers of great images on sites like Flickr, Tumblr, DeviantArt and seemingly infinite art blogs that we’ve created Best Art Ever (This Week), a weekly depository for just some of the pieces of especially compelling artwork that we come across in our regular travels across the Web. Some of it’s new, some of it’s old, some of it’s created by working professionals, some of it’s created by future stars, some of it’s created by talented fans, and some of it’s endearingly silly. All of it’s awesome.

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Einstein Gets His Hands Dirty In ‘The Manhattan Projects’ #13 [Preview]

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In stores this week is The Manhattan Projects #13, the latest issue of the Image Comics title. Written by Jonathan Hickman with art from Nick Pitarra and Jordie Bellaire, the series features fictional (and slightly mad) versions of Einstein, Oppenheimer, Fermi, and other real life scientists from the World War II era, in an alternate history in which the Manhattan Project was actually a front for a group focused on far more esoteric scientific experiments.

In this issue, we flashback to the members of the project burying one of their own, as fractures begin to form between the various scientists. Image Comics has provided ComicsAlliance with a six page preview of The Manhattan Projects #13, which you can view below.

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