todd klein

Human And A Hero: Gary Phillips On 'Vigilante: Southland'
This week sees the release of DC Comics' new revival of the classic Vigilante character in Vigilante: Southland by Gary Phillips, Elena Casagrande, Giulia Brusco and Todd Klein, which takes the concept and transports it modern day Los Angeles for a tale of crime, corruption and community tension. ComicsAlliance caught up with Phillips to talk about what separates the new Vigilante from the rest of the DC Universe, and constructing a socially relevant superhero story.
'Doom Patrol' #1 Marks A Strong Debut For Young Animal
This week saw the debut of DC Comics’ new “pop-up imprint” Young Animal, spearheaded by The Umbrella Academy’s Gerard Way. Described as “Comics For Dangerous Humans”, Young Animal seeks to recapture the spark of the Golden Age of Vertigo, while updating it for the 21st century. Way himself has led the charge as the writer of this week’s Doom Patrol #1, along with Nick Derington on art, Tamra Bonvillain on colors and Todd Klein on letters and while occasionally --- and seemingly intentionally --- confusing, it’s a strong start for DC’s newest imprint.
Robert McGinnis Paints New Retro Covers For Neil Gaiman
Neil Gaiman has announced on his blog that Harper Collins is releasing new paperback editions of his novels featuring retro-style covers painted by legendary artist Robert E. McGinnis. The first of these is American Gods, which is already available for pre-order on Amazon.com.
Gail Simone On The Unsettling Possibilities Of 'Clean Room'
Imagine you had the perfect life with everything you ever wanted and a partner to share it with. Now imagine that your partner read a self-help book that drove them insane to the point of suicide. Wouldn't you want answers? That's the kick-off to Gail Simone and Jon Davis-Hunt's Vertigo series Clean Room. Within six issues, we've followed Chloe Pierce as she tries to understand the inner-workings of a Scientolgy-like cult headed by the enigmatic Astrid Mueller, and things keep getting stranger and more unsettling the further down the rabbit hole we go. ComicsAlliance chatted to Gail Simone about building the world of Clean Room, plus Vertigo provided us with pages from this week's Clean Room #7!
Grant Morrison's 'The Multiversity 'Annotations, Part 1
Teased for years and finally launched this week, The Multiversity is a universe-jumping series of DC Comics one-shots tracking the cosmic monitor Nix Uotan and an assemblage of star-crossed heroes as they attempt to save 52 universes and beyond from a trippy cosmic existential threat that, like much of Morrison’s best work, represents something far more mundane and relatable. Tying back into the very first Multiverse story in DC’s history, the heroes of these universes become aware of this threat by reading about it in comic books… comic books that, it turns out, take place in neighboring universes. Indeed, writer Grant Morrison continues his streak of highly metatextual DC cosmic epics with this eight-issue mega-series (plus one Tolkienesque guidebook). Described by Morrison as "the ultimate statement of what DC is", The Multiversity naturally offers the reader much beyond the surface level adventure, and that means annotations. Rather than merely filling out checklists of references, my hope with this feature is to slowly unearth and extrapolate a narrative model for Morrison and his collaborators' work on The Multiversity; an interconnecting web of themes and cause and effect that works both on literal and symbolic levels. Three pages into the preview for The Multiversity #1, I knew I was going to have a lot to work with. With no further ado, go get your erasers and your textbooks, close your laptops, sharpen your pencils, and get ready for some course notes. Let's go to school.
Best Art Ever (This Week) - 05.30.14
We make a regular practice at ComicsAlliance of spotlighting particular artists or specific bodies of work, as well as the special qualities of comic book storytelling, but because cartoonists, illustrators and their fans share countless numbers of great pinups, fan art and other illustrations on sites like Flickr, Tumblr, DeviantArt and seemingly infinite art blogs that we’ve created Best Art Ever (This Week), a weekly depository for just some of the pieces of especially compelling artwork that we come across in our regular travels across the Web. Some of it’s new, some of it’s old, some of it’s created by working professionals, some of it’s created by future stars, some of it’s created by talented fans, awnd some of it’s endearingly silly. All of it is awesome.
Best Art Ever (This Week) - 05.23.14
We make a regular practice at ComicsAlliance of spotlighting particular artists or specific bodies of work, as well as the special qualities of comic book storytelling, but because cartoonists, illustrators and their fans share countless numbers of great pinups, fan art and other illustrations on sites like Flickr, Tumblr, DeviantArt and seemingly infinite art blogs that we’ve created Best Art Ever (This Week), a weekly depository for just some of the pieces of especially compelling artwork that we come across in our regular travels across the Web. Some of it’s new, some of it’s old, some of it’s created by working professionals, some of it’s created by future stars, some of it’s created by talented fans, awnd some of it’s endearingly silly. All of it is awesome.
Ask Chris #180: Comic Book Lettering
Q: Lettering: who does it best and why? -- @awa64 A: Comic book lettering is up there with inking and coloring in the holy trinity of underrated comic book skills, but it's also one of those things that, once you start paying attention to it, you'll never be able to not notice it again. I'm not exaggerating even a little bit when I say that it's one of those things that can absolutely ruin a comic
Todd Klein Drops Some 'Knowledge'
For years, master of comic book lettering and logo design Todd Klein has released a series of limited edition prints created in collaboration with some of comics’ most superlative talents, each spotlighting Klein's unmatched gift and love for exquisite typography and design. In keeping with that theme, the prints have been ordered alphabetically, with the latest brought to us by the letter K: &quo

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