Bat-Manga

On The Cheap: Get DC Digital First Comics For Half Price
This week, Comixology has launched a sale on DC's digital-first line, which means that for half of their usual cover price, you can catch up on rip-roaring retro adventure in books like Bombshells, Wonder Woman '77, and Batman '66, get continuity-free adventures in Adventures of Superman, Sensation Comics, and Legends of the Dark Knight, and --- perhaps most importantly --- finally get the answer to the question of whether Batman could defeat a pro wrestler.
Preview: Batman vs The Outsider in Kuwata's 'Bat-Manga' #31
One of the most fun things about reading Jiro Kuwata's Bat-Manga is seeing all the changes that Kuwata made when he adapted stories that were originally published in the American Batman comics. Sometimes, they're taken to a more elaborate extreme, like the now-legendary Lord Death Man story, and sometimes they're almost completely rewritten, like Kuwata's take on Batman's battle with the pro-wrestling Hooded Hangman, but if you're a die-hard fan of the Caped Crusader, there's always enough in there to be amazing. That's why I'm so stoked about the next story, in which Batman faces the hulking, disfigured form of The Outsider -- better known as his once-faithful butler, Alfred Pennyworth! Check out preview pages below, and get excited, it's gonna be a good one.
Could Batman Beat A Pro Wrestler In His Element?
Q: Can Batman defeat a pro wrestler in his natural element? --@ykarps A: At first glance, this seems like one of the easiest questions I've ever tackled in this column. I mean, of course he could, right? He's Batman. While the rest of us were learning algebra in 8th grade, this dude was traveling across the world learning how to be the best possible expert at everything, just in case he needed it for his never-ending war on crime. Surely that would have to include professional wrestling, the King of Sports, if only because there's no other discipline that combines theatricality and combat in the way that would serve him so well back in Gotham City. And yet, the more I think about it, the more I realize that, as shocking as it might be for me to say this as the World's Foremost Batmanologist... I doubt even Batman could beat a pro wrestler in his natural element.
Chip Kidd: Remixing Batman And Designing Super-Solutions
Chip Kidd is a one of American publishing's foremost graphic designers, a respected novelist and author in his own right, and a life-long comic book fan. He's worked with DC Comics on a number of different projects over the years, writing histories, creating logos, designing books, and even authoring stories like 2012's Batman: Death By Design graphic novel with Dave Taylor. Recently, he produced a "remix" of the first-ever Batman story (which was originally slated to be published in DC's "Detective Comics #27 Special Edition" giveaway, but ended up as a feature in the deluxe hardcover Batman: A Celebration Of 75 Years instead). While at San Diego Comic-Con last month, we got a few minutes to drop by DC's booth and talk with Kidd about Batman, his design work, and his current (and upcoming) projects.
War Rocket Ajax Early Edition: Suicide Squad, Bat-Manga + More
This week, Chris and Matt are oddly surprised by the (possible?) commentary found in New Suicide Squad #1 by Sean Ryan and Jeremy Roberts. Then they like how Armor Hunters #1 by Robert Venditti and Doug Braithwaite hits the big event-comic notes without being contrived. And finally, they discuss a couple of DC's digital-comic offerings: Scooby Doo Team-Up #5 by Sholly Fisch and Dario Brizuela, and Bat-Manga #1 by Jiro Kuwata.
Jiro Kuwata's Batman Manga Finally Earns A Full Book Release In Japan
A lot of people hadn't heard about artist Jiro Kuwata's mid-1960s manga adaptation of Batman until the 2008 release of Chip Kidd's book Bat-Manga!, which included translated excerpts of the work, but didn't collect the full story (or include Kuwata's name on the cover). Now, Kuwata's Batman stories, which originally ran in the magazines Weekly Shōnen King and Shōnen Gahō, has finally been collecte
‘Bat-Manga’ Could Return For a Second Volume
I'll never forget the day I opened up Chip Kidd's "Bat-manga: The Secret History of Batman in Japan." Know why? Because the first thing I saw was a Scare Glow-lookalike called Lord Death Man. It was bliss. A blend of Jiro Kuwata's Batman manga plus shots of toys and other artifacts from the 1966 Batman TV show craze in Japan seemed too good to be true...