Harlan Ellison

Buy This Book: 'Batman '66: The Lost Episode'
There are a lot of great things about the Batman '66 ongoing series, but I think my favorite is how it's been expanding the Dutch-angled, pop-art universe of the original TV show beyond its three-season run. There have been new adventures for the show's roster of special guest villains, new locations, and even new characters in the form of additions like the Arkham Institute's Dr. Holly Quinn and the massive, atomic-powered Bat-Robot. On top of all that, the not-at-all surprising success of the Batman '66 revival has expanded the universe in one of the most interesting ways by finally giving us one of the biggest missed opportunities in the character's history: A full adaptation of Harlan Ellison's unproduced Two-Face story. I've known that this story was out there for a while because it always comes up in discussions of great superhero stories that never happened, and finally getting to read it in this week's Batman '66: The Lost Episode was a fantastic experience -- not just because the story itself was fun, but because the way it was presented was amazing.
Len Wein Talks 'Batman '66: The Lost Episode' [Interview]
On November 19, DC Comics will release Batman '66: The Lost Episode, a bookshelf-format one-shot by writer Len Wein and penciller José Luis Garcia-López -- superhero comics legends, both -- adapting a previously-unknown story that Harlan Ellison wrote for the classic Adam West and Burt Ward TV show: the introduction of Two-Face. The project is a very special companion to DC's popular and critically acclaimed digital-first Batman '66 series. In addition to its prestigious veteran storytellers, the book also features inking by Joe Prado, colors by Alex Sinclair and cover art by Alex Ross, all industry leaders in their disciplines. At New York Comic Con this past weekend, we had the opportunity to sit down with Wein and discuss the origin of the project, his friendship with Ellison, and the experience of adapting an unfilmed television episode into the comic book format.
Garcia-Lopez To Draw Harlan Ellison's Lost Batman '66 Episode
The hits keep coming out of DC Comics' west coast digital comics division, whose senior editor Jim Chadwick announced at Comic-Con International that the next release from his Batman '66 line will be The Lost Episode. What makes this a big is twofold: the lost episode is indeed a lost episode of the classic 1960s television series starring Adam West and Burt Ward, and it was written by none other than Harlan Ellison; award-winning television, writer, novelist, comics scribe, and notorious litigant. Secondly, the special issue will be drawn by José Luis García-López, one of the best comic book artists of all time. Adapting the script for comics will be Len Wein, a legendary comics figure in his own right. DC hasn't released clean images from the project yet, but we know that Ellison's unproduced script would have introduced Harvey "Two-Face" Dent into the television series.
Original Harlan Ellison 'Star Trek' Script Gets A Comic Book
With its dramatic tale of time travel trauma, "City on the Edge of Forever" is widely considered one of the best episodes of the original Star Trek TV series, but what made it to the screen was quite different from sci-fi writer Harlan Ellison's original script, which was too long for a one-hour TV show and had far too many speaking parts for the production budget. Comics don't have thos
‘Masters of Comic Book Art’ Documentary Reemerges from the VHS Ether [Video]
Presented by an uncharacteristically reverent Harlan Ellison, Masters of Comic Book Art is a documentary film that offers insightful on-camera remarks from some of the medium's most gifted artists: Neal Adams, Steve Ditko, Will Eisner, Jean Giraud aka Moebius, Jack Kirby, Harvey Kurtzman, Frank Miller and Bernie Wrightson, all of whom muse on their most famous works and the medium that they love..
‘Mystery Incorporated’ Is The Best Scooby-Doo Has Ever Been [Review]
if you've been reading ComicsAlliance for a while, you might recall that I am a dude with some strong opinions about the Scooby Doo franchise, and to be honest, the main reason for that is Scooby-Doo! Mystery Incorporated. This week, the second half of the first season finally made it to DVD with a fourteen-episode set called Crystal Cove Curse, two discs worth of pretty compelling reasons why it'