Ian Edginton

Edgington & Trifolgi's 'Hinterkind' Reaches Epic Conclusion
Edgington & Trifolgi's 'Hinterkind' Reaches Epic Conclusion
When the first issue of Ian Edginton and Francesco Trifolgi's Hinterkind hit the stands in 2013, this tale of humans and mythological creatures battling one another in a post-apocalyptic future immediately found a passionate and vocal fan base, and became a modern-day example of the offbeat genre-blending fantasy that has become a trademark of the Vertigo line from day one. Now, after 18 issues of giants and faeries and dragons and other fantastical insanity, the series is drawing to a close, with leading lady Prosper Monday and her band of companions hurtling headlong into their greatest battle – and we're excited to bring you an exclusive five-page preview of the grand finale!
Buy This Book: 2000 AD #1900 Launches Three New Stories
Buy This Book: 2000 AD #1900 Launches Three New Stories
The way I've always understood anthology series is that you never want every story to end at the same time, because the idea is that by chaining everything together, the reader never has a chance to jump off. That might sound mercenary, but really, it's just simple economics: If everything you're into ends all at once, then you've got a lot less incentive to come back for the next issue. Right? Right. Well, it seems that last week's issue of 2000 AD went against that little bit of conventional wisdom by capping off every story that they had going so that they could set up this week's offering: Their 1900th issue, which celebrates the milestone by launching three new stories, and provides a perfect jumping-on point. If you haven't been reading 2000 AD and want to see what all the fuss is about, this is the issue to get -- and you should definitely get it, because all three stories are pretty awesome.
Cover Versions: INJ Culbard's Beautiful 'Brass Sun' Gallery
Cover Versions: INJ Culbard's Beautiful 'Brass Sun' Gallery
A few weeks ago, I read through Ian Edginton and INJ Culbard's Brass Sun and loved it. It's got a compelling plot, engaging characters and it's set in a world full of possibilities for strange adventure. Of course, it's also beautiful, with some of the best art that you can find on the stands. That's why today, we're shining the spotlight onto it again with a gallery of Culbard's incredibly striking covers, from both the American miniseries release and its original serialized run in the pages of 2000 AD. Check them out below, including an exclusive first look at the final covers for issues #5-6. free of logos and other trade dress.
Buy This Book: Ian Edginton & I.N.J. Culbard's 'Brass Sun'
Buy This Book: Ian Edginton & I.N.J. Culbard's 'Brass Sun'
It's a pretty big flaw to have when your job is knowing things about comic books, but I'll admit that when I hear the words 2000 AD, I tend to just think of Judge Dredd and stop there. In my head, I'm fully aware that the weekly anthology has way more science fiction to offer beyond the walls of Mega City One -- and I've got the paperbacks around here to prove it -- but far too often, I forget about everything that doesn't have gigantic kneepads and a tendency to throw creeps into the Iso-Cubes. That's why I'm glad that the publisher sent over a copy of their new title, Ian Edginton and I.N.J. Culbard's Brass Sun, because otherwise, it's pretty likely that I would've missed it. That would've been a shame, too, because it's one of the most fascinating and beautiful new comics that I've read in a long while.
Hinterkind #4 [Preview]
Hinterkind #4 [Preview]
Launched in October, Ian Edginton and Francesco Trifogli's Hinterkind is a fantasy tale of a post apocalyptic Earth, in which humanity was all but completely wiped out by what is known as "The Blight." Series protagonist Prosper Monday, who has spent her entire life living in a village hidden away in an otherwise abandoned Central Park in Manhattan, is forced to leave the village for th
Judge Dredd Defies New Readers Not To Jump On '2000 AD' With New Issue
Judge Dredd Defies New Readers Not To Jump On '2000 AD' With New Issue
As it is prone to do perhaps more often than some of its American competition, British sci-fi weekly 2000 AD has designed its latest issue to be especially welcoming to new readers. Four brand new stories begin in this week's 2000 AD Prog 1850, each meant to introduce audiences to the unique blend of art, attitude and insanity that can typically be found every week in "the galaxy's greatest c