Image Comics

Neon Noir: The Art of 'Virgil' with Faith, Beckett & Mauer
Neon Noir: The Art of 'Virgil' with Faith, Beckett & Mauer
A few weeks ago, ComicsAlliance had a nice long chat with writer Steve Orlando about Virgil, the queersploitation graphic novel set in Kingston, Jamaica that he's been working on with artist J.D. Faith, colorist Chris Beckett, and letterer Tom Mauer. In honor of the book's release, we sat down with Faith, Beckett, and Mauer to hear about their experiences working on the book, and how they operated together as a team.
Hugo Awards Ballot Stuffing Affects Nominations
Hugo Awards Ballot Stuffing Affects Nominations
This weekend, the Hugo Awards nominations were announced, and almost every category was affected by the "Sad Puppies" campaign, which encouraged anti-liberal voters to push specific works by conservative authors. While every award event with nomination voting has people pushing for votes in specific directions, this systematic approach to affect every single category and make it less about the quality of the work has made these nominations pretty useless. The good news is that the campaign had very little effect on the "graphic story" category, which covers comics, but the Sad Puppies voters did manage to get their one selection in that category into the nominations as well.
New Comic Recommendations for 03.25.15
New Comic Recommendations for 03.25.15
The question most often asked of the ComicsAlliance staff is a variation of, "Which comic books should I be reading?" or, "I'm new to comics, what's a good place to start?" The Wednesday deluge of new comic books, graphic novels and collected editions can be daunting even for the longtime reader, much less for those totally unfamiliar with creators, characters and publishers, and the dark mysteries of comic book shopping like variants, pre-ordering, and formats.
The Wicked and The Decapitated: The Covers of Jamie McKelvie
The Wicked and The Decapitated: The Covers of Jamie McKelvie
Thumbnail is a new recurring feature on ComicsAlliance in which we invite our writers to reflect on comic book details that deserve a little extra attention, whether it’s a favorite character, and artistic choice, or a striking page. For this installment, Steve Morris looks at the meaning behind Jamie McKelvie and Matt Wilson's The Wicked & The Divine covers — and the cruel joke they've been building up to.
Jeff Lemire and Dustin Nguyen's 'Descender' Is Worth It
Jeff Lemire and Dustin Nguyen's 'Descender' Is Worth It
Hollywood just can't keep its grubby little hands off of our stuff. Last week it was announced that Sony Pictures snapped up the rights to Jeff Lemire and Dustin Nguyen's Descender well before the book's March publication, a practice becoming more common. This type of announcement may cause consternation among some, but you have to take it on a case-by-case basis: If anything Mark Millar writes gets a deal before publication, please, be offended; in all other circumstances, reserve judgment until a "professional" receives an advance copy and dictates your opinion to you. (This is my new persona: hated.) Descender, on its way from Image in March, is epic, intelligent, and full of heart, and it looks like Sony was right on the money for once.
Comic Artist Jeremy Haun's Dino Day Kickstarter
Comic Artist Jeremy Haun's Dino Day Kickstarter
Comics artist Jeremy Haun is currently running a Kickstarter for a project he calls Dino Day, which the father of two created to engage his sons in the process of creating art. The end product will be a hardcover art book of all of his dinosaur drawings, which range from detailed and serious to loose or humorous. Haun has drawn for DC, Marvel, Image, Top Cow, and more, and is currently the artist on DC's Constantine and Wolf Moon. He's also a part of the Bad Karma collective. While Dino Day has surpassed its funding goal, the Kickstarter is still running for another six days, so fans can still back the project to help it hit stretch goals like fancier printing and additional t-shirt designs.
Boom EIC Matt Gagnon on Push Comics Forward [Interview]
Boom EIC Matt Gagnon on Push Comics Forward [Interview]
Boom Studios has a reputation in the comics industry for publishing an increasingly diverse group of books and creators. This commitment to diversity in genre and people is reflected in an all-new initiative the publisher announced today in Previews with a letter from founder Ross Richie. While 2015 is the 10th anniversary of Boom, the publisher wants to talk about what's next rather than what's come before. They call this discussion of the future Push Comics Forward and they don't want it to be only about Boom. Push Comics Forward is Boom's way of focusing on the ongoing conversation about diversity and the future of the industry. To learn more about this initiative and what to expect from Boom for the next ten years and beyond, we spoke with Editor-in-Chief Matt Gagnon.
Keatinge & Del Duca Talk Fantasy & Inspiration In 'Shutter'
Keatinge & Del Duca Talk Fantasy & Inspiration In 'Shutter'
Since the first issue hit stands earlier this year, Joe Keatinge and Leila del Duca's Shutter has established itself as one of Image's most popular new titles. The tale of Kate Kristopher, a world-famous ex-explorer who gets embroiled in all manner of mystery and adventure, it's been winning over readers with its idiosyncratic blend of science fiction, urban fantasy, and good old-fashioned derring do. With the first paperback collection released this week, ComicsAlliance sat down with the series' creators to talk about developing the world's characters, the story so far, and pushing the limits of their self-created reality.
Crime In A New World In Johnston And Greenwood's 'The Fuse'
Crime In A New World In Johnston And Greenwood's 'The Fuse'
On its own, the police procedural doesn't have that much traction within modern comics. In the early days of the medium -- especially in newspaper strips -- it was a different story, and straight-up police tales were among some of the most popular of the day. A little over a decade ago, though, everybody seemed to realize the potential to mix police procedurals with other genres, frequently to fantastic and award-winning results: Alan Moore and Gene Ha's Top Ten; Gotham Central, by Ed Brubaker, Greg Rucka, Michael Lark and others; and Powers by Brian Michael Bendis and Michael Avon Oeming. Those books realized the natural fit that cop stories had within superhero stories, and thus a sub-genre was born. But there's still plenty of room left for cop shows in comics, and over the last few years, the sci-fi procedural has definitely been in its ascendance. With Antony Johnston and Justin Greenwood's The Fuse, we have a new standard by which to judge all others.

Load More Articles