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Jem and the Holograms: Infinite Takes Both Bands to a New World
Back when the end of Jem and the Holograms was announced, series writer Kelly Thompson promised that something new and very exciting was on the way for everybody's favorite dayglo pop stars. And Friday at Emerald City Comicon we learned just what that is. Launching in June 2017, Jem And The Holograms: Infinite is a bi-weekly event split into two comics, both written by Thompson.
ComicsAlliance's Best Of 2016: The Best Comics For Teens
While 2016 was a tough year in many regards, it produced some amazing comics, including a lot of great comics aimed at teen readers. Our writers and editors have made their picks of the best comics of the past year, and you, the readers of ComicsAlliance, have voted for your favorites. Now check out the best comics for teens in 2016, including our critics' picks, listed in alphabetical order, and the comics you voted the runner up and winner in this category! This is the very best of 2016!
IDW Announces 'Misfits' Series Spinning Out Of 'Jem'
Ever since I first saw Pizzazz, Roxy, and Stormer enter this world by literally crashing through a wall on motorcycles shaped like guitars, I knew they were destined for bigger things. Sure, they're a little villainous, and they're definitely antagonistic, but there's no way that they were going to spend all of their times playing second fiddle to Little Miss Pink-Hair and the Singalongs, right? Now, the time in the spotlight has finally come for everyone's favorite mischief-makers: At San Diego Comic-Con, IDW announced an upcoming Misfits series, spinning out of the events of the ongoing Jem and the Holograms comic, written by Kelly Thompson with covers by M. Victoria Robado, and interiors by an artist to be announced later.
Lost in Transition: 'Jem & the Holograms,' Blaze & the Misfits
Jem and the Holograms is about an all-woman glitter rock band and their quest to rise from the ranks of the Sufficiently Outrageous to become Truly Outrageous. The group has run into a problem: the lead singer, Jerrica, is terrified of singing in public. Thanks to Jerrica’s deceased father, though, they also have a solution: a holographic supercomputer that helps Jerrica create a stage persona that lets her get over her phobia. There would be a lot of resonant storytelling with me if it just stopped there, since I know a thing or two about how a persona you can put on and take off can make things easier –- and harder. Like Jerrica, I also have a secret identity. However, sometimes solutions just free you up to tackle new problems, and the new problem that plagues Jem and the Holograms is their rival band, the Misfits, who claim that their songs are better and that they are going to get her.
The Question: What's The Best Comic About Women By Women?
The comics world is full of questions, from, “Who would win in a fight?” to, “Who came up with that weird idea?” Here at ComicsAlliance, we spend a lot of time thinking about all of it, from the big questions that matter a lot to the small ones that probably don’t matter at all but are still kinda fascinating. With The Question, we’re going to give our writers the opportunity to answer some of these brain-ticklers, because if we’re thinking about these things, you might be thinking about them too. This time we asked our writers; what's your favorite comic by women about women? This year's Ignatz and Eisner wins suggest that women in comics are beginning to get the recognition they deserve, both as creators and as an audience. But there have always been great comics by women and great comics about women, and some comics that are both, and they exist across genres, borders, and cultures.
'Jem' Preview: Synergy Uses Her Power To Build A Website
One of the best things about the relaunched Jem and the Holograms comic is how rewarding it's been for long-time fans of the show, going deep into characters' personalities and teaching us new things about them that were only hinted at in the cartoon. Jerrica's stage fright, for instance, was a new invention for the comic that helped to drive the story in a very entertaining way. The first arc did a lot to set that stuff up, but now that we're moving into the second, they're not done yet, because in #7, we learn the shocking news that Jerrica Benton doesn't listen to podcasts.