neal adams

Bizarro Back Issues: 'Captain Power' Is 'Terminator' For Kids
Bizarro Back Issues: 'Captain Power' Is 'Terminator' For Kids
A few weeks ago, I found myself in an antique store, and --- being the kind of person I am --- I pretty much ignored anything that wasn't a vintage Santa Claus figurine or a banged-up long box full of back issues. I mean, I can see an old lamp or a gently used kitchen table pretty much any time I want to, but finding out what comic books could properly be considered "antiques" was an opportunity that doesn't come along every day. As you might expect, the answer was "a bunch of random-ass comics from the late '80s and early '90s," but mixed in there with Knightquest tie-ins and that one issue of Green Lantern: Mosaic where John Stewart explains Christmas to the aliens was an issue that caught my eye. It was Captain Power and the Soldiers of the Future #2, which comes complete with some of the weirdest house ads I've ever seen.
Say Wassup To Superman With 'Coming Of The Supermen' #2
Say Wassup To Superman With 'Coming Of The Supermen' #2
On the off chance that you missed it, the first issue of Neal Adams' Coming of the Supermen was what you might describe as "next-level bonkers." Admittedly, it wasn't quite up to the weirdness standards set by Batman: Odyssey, in which a shirtless and possibly fully nude Bruce Wayne spoke directly to the reader while recounting his adventures in the Batcave, but still. The first issue had a squadron of Supermen, Lois Lane working as a TV newscaster and exposition delivery system, and, perhaps most amazing of all, the reveal that the Sphinx was constructed by Darkseid in his own image. Now, it looks like the high-energy weirdness is set to continue when the second issue hits stands next week. Check out an exclusive preview, and let's discuss all the weirdness we've got this time.
Neal Adams' 'Superman: The Coming Of The Supermen' #1 Is Weird
Neal Adams' 'Superman: The Coming Of The Supermen' #1 Is Weird
The legendary Neal Adams has pretty much had carte blanche at DC Comics in recent years, and the world is a greater place for it. He has given the comics industry so much, and now he's allowed to do whatever he wants, which has already led to the bonkers fever dream that was Batman: Odyssey. When it was announced Adams would be following that up with a spiritual sequel in Superman: The Coming of the Supermen, we all knew it would be something to behold, but no-one could have predicted a comic quite like this would exist in a million years.
On The Cheap: The Intro Of Ra's Al-Ghul In The Neal Adams Sale
On The Cheap: The Intro Of Ra's Al-Ghul In The Neal Adams Sale
This week, Comixology has launched a sale featuring the work of the legendary Neal Adams, and let's be real here: the odds are pretty good that you're already well aware of the man and his work. Whether it's his classic adventure stories of the '70s, or his more recent, mind-boggling miniseries, Neal Adams has had a hand in producing some of the most memorable comics of the past five decades. So you'll forgive me if you have this one already, but I'd be remiss if I didn't point out that you can grab one of my all-time favorite stories today for under two dollars: Batman #243 and #244, in which Denny O'Neil and Neal Adams introduce the world to Ra's al-Ghul and Talia, and build to one of the single greatest pages in the history of the Caped Crusader.
One of a Kind: A Gallery Of Neal Adams' Best DC Covers
One of a Kind: A Gallery Of Neal Adams' Best DC Covers
Neal Adams is one of those creators who has had --- and is still having --- such a profound effect on the medium of comics that it’s difficult to even know where to start talking about him. His work for DC Comics in the 60s and 70s was responsible for evolving our view of a number of characters, including Batman and Superman. At 74 years of age, Adams is as eager as ever to tell new stories with DC’s biggest heroes, and this month sees the release of the first issue of his new six issue mini-series, Superman: The Coming of the Supermen. To mark the occasion, we've compiled a collection of his best DC cover art.
On The Cheap: The Len Wein Batman Collection Is 83% Off
On The Cheap: The Len Wein Batman Collection Is 83% Off
Digital comics make for a pretty fantastic holiday gift. They're easy to buy, you don't have to leave the house to get 'em, and you can send 'em to friends and family across the country for free without having to fight your way through crowds at the post office. So as the time winds down before Christmas finally gets here on Friday, DC and Comixology have launched a "DC 101 Sale" --- and whether you're picking up some last-minute gifts or just looking for something for yourself, it's well worth checking out. The usual problem --- well, "problem" --- with these "101" sales is that they're usually full of stuff that you've already read, but this time, there are some fantastic deep cuts on sale that you shouldn't miss, all of which are dropped down to a mere six bucks. But if you want the single best deal in the entire collection, then you need to get Tales of the Batman: Len Wein.
Evolution of Green Arrow: Best Green Arrow Stories by Decade
Evolution of Green Arrow: Best Green Arrow Stories by Decade
Many of comics’ most popular heroes have been around for decades, and in the case of the big names from the publisher now known as DC Comics, some have been around for a sizable chunk of a century. As these characters passed through the different historical eras known in comics as the Golden Age (the late 1930s through the early 1950s), the Silver Age (the mid 1950s through the late 1960s), the Bronze Age (the early 1970s through the mid 1980s) and on into modern times, they have experienced considerable changes in tone and portrayal that reflect the zeitgeist of the time. With this feature we’ll help you navigate the very best stories of DC Comics’ most beloved characters decade by decade. This week, we’re taking a look at the best Green Arrow comics.
Evolution of Green Lantern: The Best Stories by Decade
Evolution of Green Lantern: The Best Stories by Decade
Many of comics’ most popular heroes have been around for decades, and in the case of the big names from the publisher now known as DC Comics, some have been around for a sizable chunk of a century. As these characters passed through the different historical eras known in comics as the Golden Age (the late 1930s through the early 1950s), the Silver Age (the mid 1950s through the late 1960s), the Bronze Age (the early 1970s through the mid 1980s) and on into modern times, they have experienced considerable changes in tone and portrayal that reflect the zeitgeist of the time. With this new feature we’ll help you navigate the very best stories of DC Comics’ most beloved characters decade by decade. This week, we’re taking a look at the Green Lantern.
The Evolution of Batman: The Best Batman Stories by Decade
The Evolution of Batman: The Best Batman Stories by Decade
Many of comics’ most popular heroes have been around for decades, and in the case of the big names from the publisher now known as DC Comics, some have been around for a sizable chunk of a century. As these characters passed through the different historical eras known in comics as the Golden Age (the late 1930s through the early 1950s), the Silver Age (the mid 1950s through the late 1960s), the Bronze Age (the early 1970s through the mid 1980s) and on into modern times, they have experienced considerable changes in tone and portrayal that reflect the zeitgeist of the time. With this new feature we’ll help you navigate the very best stories of DC Comics’ most beloved characters decade by decade. This week, we’re taking a look at Batman.

Load More Articles