strip panel naked

Strip Panel Naked: Playing with Panel Gutters In 'Moon Knight'
Jeff Lemire’s current run on Moon Knight has been interesting, and it’s clear that he’s going all out to tell a unique version of that character and story. But what’s immediately catches your attention across both arcs of this new run is the art --- first with Greg Smallwood and now Francesco Francavilla and James Stokoe. Among a lot of superhero/”big two” books, it’s been consistently inventive visually, and the current run is no different. The thing I wanted to specifically talk about with the latest issue, Moon Knight #7, is the panel borders --- but bear with me. Both Stokoe and Francavilla are making really subtle modifications to how they outline their frames, and it all comes down to a way of controlling the reader’s pace and understanding.
Strip Panel Naked: Eyeline Control in 'James Bond: Hammerhead'
A big part about what makes comics work is eyelines. I’ve talked before about Chris Samnee’s genius use of them on the current Black Widow series, but another great example caught my attention this week. The opening page of James Bond: Hammerhead, by Luca Casalanguida, Chris Blythe, Andy Diggle and Simon Bowland struck me immediately. It brings you straight into the action with the rather dynamic, but simple, page design.
Strip Panel Naked: Framing Locations In 'The Vision'
Gabriel Hernandez Walta might be the most understated artist working on a big-two book. With each issue of The Vision, written by Tom King and with colors by Jordie Bellaire, Walta gave readers a masterclass in visual storytelling. One of the elements that makes this book so strong is how Walta decides to use the locations and backgrounds to frame characters, which then informs so much of the story happening on the page. There’s an example in the fourth issue that really encapsulates the clever work going into the book.