Rob Leigh

Everything Changed! What You Missed In 'Superman Reborn'
Everything Changed! What You Missed In 'Superman Reborn'
This week saw the final part of "Superman Reborn", the crossover that answered a number of pressing questions about The Man of Tomorrow's status in the DC Universe, but also left readers with a good number more. The end of "Superman Reborn" had some huge consequences for DC Rebirth and Superman's continuity, but what exactly happened, and what does it mean for the future of the DC Universe?
The Truth About Superman Is Revealed In 'Action Comics' #976
The Truth About Superman Is Revealed In 'Action Comics' #976
If you've been following the current "Superman Reborn" crossover, you know that The Man of Tomorrow's entire world has been turned upside-down and inside-out by the revelations regarding his place in the DC Universe, but there's still more to come! Everything comes to a head with some major shocks and surprises in week's Action Comics #975 by Dan Jurgens, Doug Mahnke, Jaime Mendoza, Christian Alamy, Trevor Scott, Wil Quintana and Rob Leigh, and we have an exclusive preview of the "Superman Reborn" finale.
The Truth About The Fake Clark Kent In 'Superman Reborn'
The Truth About The Fake Clark Kent In 'Superman Reborn'
Since the start of DC Rebirth last year, one of the biggest mysteries has revolved around the identity of the mystery Clark Kent that appeared following the death of New 52 Superman and re-emergence of his pre-Flashpoint predecessor. However, in the pages of this week's Action Comics #975 by Dan Jurgens, Doug Mahnke, Jaime Mendoza, Wil Quintana and Rob Leigh, the answer is laid out bare for all to see and while it's someone you'll recognize, it is not someone you'd expect.
Grant Morrison's 'The Multiversity 'Annotations, Part 4
Grant Morrison's 'The Multiversity 'Annotations, Part 4
The fourth issue of the series, Pax Americana with art by Frank Quitely, colors by Nathan Fairbairn and letters by Rob Leigh, is probably the most widely anticipated of the series, and certainly the most-hyped. It's Morrison's attempt to update and revise the structure of Watchmen, but applied to the original Charlton characters, as that Alan Moore & Dave Gibbons work was originally intended to in its first pitch. While Watchmen followed a strict nine-panel grid structure (some panels would be bisected or extended, but that was the general latticework on which everything hung), Pax Americana goes for eight, resembling not only harmonic octaves of music and colors of the rainbow that make up much of the multiversal structure Morrison is working with but also the "Algorithm 8" that allows President Harley to perceive the underpinning structure of the universe and use it to his advantage. That algorithm is, of course, the eight-panel grid (and the 8-shape made by one's eyes while reading the page) that forms the comic book universe he lives in. The book moves backwards in eight color-coded sections, which I'll denote, that correspond to the evolutionary stages of humanity/a single person espoused by Don Beck and Chris Cowan's spiral dynamics, or, more specifically, Ken Wilber's later integral theory, which incorporated it. I'd never heard of it before this book, and from all research I've done there's a reason for that; it seems to be widely accepted as bunk pseudoscience by any academic institution, which makes it a perfect evolution of the original Question and Rorschach's stark black-and-white Randian Objectivism, while also tying into not only Pax's obsession with the number eight but its role in the Multiversity series as a whole, both due to the nature of music in octaves which makes up the structure of the DC multiverse as well as the colors of the rainbow that form the Source Wall. This is a long one, so with no further ado...