Mutants

Super: Inhumans and the Sinister Gentrification of Otherness
Super: Inhumans and the Sinister Gentrification of Otherness
The Inhumans used to be one of the more fascinating minor oddities of the Marvel Universe; ultimately only about as important as the Atlanteans or Monster Island, but just as pleasingly weird. With Medusa's magnificent hair, Gorgon's thunderhooves, and Black Bolt's mute power in a world of chatty heroes, they were deservedly called 'uncanny' back when the X-Men were still a preppy study group. But the Inhumans have become the "fetch" of the Marvel Universe; the more Marvel tries to make them happen, the more certain it seems that they never will. What makes the Inhumans' rise especially hard to accept is that it seems directly tied to the fall of the mutants. Today's X-Men are comics' most significant icons of otherness, and treating them as interchangeable with another set of outsiders is dehumanizing on a whole new level.
Mutant & Proud: Understanding The Queerness Of The X-Men
Mutant & Proud: Understanding The Queerness Of The X-Men
The X-Men did not have an openly LGBT team-member for almost their first forty years of publication. This was primarily an egregious act of self-censorship on Marvel's part, but it may actually have helped strengthen mutants as a queer metaphor. Where LGBT people couldn't be part of the X-Men's text, the experiences of LGBT people came to dominate the X-Men's subtext. In the third of three essays examining the parallels between fictional mutants and real life LGBT people, I'll look at how the mutations themselves -- and the identity struggles of many X-Men characters -- served to underline the essential queerness of mutants.
Mutant & Proud: Mutants As Queer Pariahs
Mutant & Proud: Mutants As Queer Pariahs
Mutants as a metaphor for real minority groups are an awkward fit for a number of reasons. First of all, mutants are actually dangerous. Second, a lot of mutants have good cause to reject their identity. Third, and perhaps crucially, mutants don't have a shared culture like real minority groups. Of course, people have said all of those things about LGBT people as well. In the second of three Pride Month essays exploring mutants as a metaphor for queer identity, I'll look at how mutants are actually a perfect metaphor for the sort of dangerous myths used to marginalize LGBT people.
Mutant & Proud: How The X-Men Represent Queer Togetherness
Mutant & Proud: How The X-Men Represent Queer Togetherness
Mutants, Marvel Comics' best known superhuman minority group, have long served as an imperfect analogue for real world minority struggles and injustices, from the concentration camps of Days of Future Past to the segregationist society of Genosha. Yet it's when X-Men stories are not trying so hard to draw parallels that they come closest to representing the experiences of one particular marginalized group. In the first of three essays in observance of LGBT Pride Month, I'll look at the special resonance that mutants have with LGBT readers, starting with an examination of the X-Men as a representation of queer family and queer community.
Hasbro Announces 16″ Marvel Universe Sentinel Comic-Con Exclusive Action Figure
Hasbro Announces 16″ Marvel Universe Sentinel Comic-Con Exclusive Action Figure
Now that Hasbro's Marvel Universe line has had a few years to amass dozens of X-Men, there's never been a better time to find creative ways of (pretend) wiping them from the face of your favorite shelves. Hasbro is heartily indulging this horrifying impulse at San Diego Comic-Con International this summer with the release of an exclusive 16" Marvel Universe Sentinel...