starman

Cast Party: Who Should Star in a 'Starman' Movie?
Cast Party: Who Should Star in a 'Starman' Movie?
Welcome to Cast Party, the feature that imagines a world with even more live action comic book adaptations than we currently have, and comes up with arguably the best casting suggestions you’re ever going to find for the movies and shows we wish could exist. This week I'm looking back to a classic of the '90s: Starman, the story of reluctant legacy hero Jack Knight, as told by James Robinson, Tony Harris, and Peter Snejbjerg.
Ask Chris #296: Starman And The Challenge Of Holding Up
Ask Chris #296: Starman And The Challenge Of Holding Up
Q: How does a (great) but very 90's comic like Starman hold up today, given its dated references like Chris Isaak? -- @david_wolkin A: What's that? You want me to write a thousand words about that one panel from Starman where Jack Knight compares himself to Chris Isaak because for some reason he (and James Robinson, I guess) thought he was the single coolest person in the world in 1994, and ended up with what might be the most ridiculous piece of dialogue of the entire decade? Can do, dear reader. Can do.
The Replacements: Celebrating LGBTQ Legacy Characters
The Replacements: Celebrating LGBTQ Legacy Characters
Since the dawn of the Silver Age, legacy characters have been a staple of superhero fiction, and having a new character step into a well loved role can open up new opportunities for writers and artists to tell different kinds of stories. In The Replacements, we’ll look back at the notable and not-so-notable heroes and villains to assume some of the most iconic mantles in the superhero genre. This week, we're celebrating Pride Week at ComicsAlliance and changing things up a little bit. Instead of looking at a singular identity and the legacy it created, we're looking at eight distinct LGBTQ+ characters who stepped into iconic superhero roles.
Ask Chris #222: This City Hates You
Ask Chris #222: This City Hates You
Q: Can a setting, location, or place actually be "a character," as people often say about Gotham City or Bioshock's Rapture, and if so, what exactly does that mean? -- @Jon_Ore A: Technically, no. No matter how well-developed or intriguing a setting is, no matter how many good stories have been set there or how characters and creators have talked about it, it's still just that: A setting. The action and development, even if they're a reaction to the setting or have effects on the setting, are all things that happen to characters. The setting just provides the backdrop. Practically, though, they can be close enough that for all intents and purposes, they might as well be characters, with everything that comes with it.
Planet Comicon 2014 Comic Creator Photos
Planet Comicon 2014 Comic Creator Photos
Kansas City's Planet Comicon has steadily grown into what may be the biggest comics and pop culture convention in the Midwest. After spending several years in the Overland Park Convention Center, a mid-sized facility in a suburb of Kansas City, last year Planet Comicon moved to Bartle Hall, a much bigger facility in the heart of downtown. This year, the convention doubled in floorspace, drew cospl

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