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Believe It! Looking Back at the Legacy of ‘Naruto’


It's been one year since the end of one of manga’s modern epics, Naruto. After 15 years of weekly publication and 700 chapters, Masashi Kishimoto wrapped up his shonen masterwork on his own terms, with critics and audiences behind him every step of the way. A look back at the series reveals a deep story about legacy, dreams and — like all shonen manga — the power and meaning of friendship.

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Filed Under: , Category: Manga, Opinion, Reviews

The Ten Best Alan Moore Stories You’ve Probably Never Read


Any look back over Alan Moore's career is likely to overlook a lot of really great comics. Beyond the usual works that are typically rattled off as the highlights of his career are British works that never got big in America, independent comics that never got wide distribution, and reams of short stories that have fallen between the cracks. You might have read a few of them, but they're all worth a look.

Alan Moore's greatest hits include Watchmen, Saga of the Swamp Thing, From Hell, Marvelman, The Killing Joke, V for Vendetta, Tom Strong, Supreme, Top Ten, Promethea, the hundreds of pages of The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen, and a couple of the best Superman stories of all time, but as this list proves, there's a lot more to Moore.

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On The Cheap: Image’s Black Friday Sale Has ‘Kaptara,’ ‘No Mercy’ And More For 50% Off

Kaptara, Chip Zdarsky and Kagan McLeod

Today is Black Friday across America, where the world of retail becomes a living nightmare not unlike the Hunger Games. If, however, you're holed up in a bunker waiting for things to blow over, you can still get in on some pretty great deals. Today at Comixology, Image has launched a gigantic 50% off sale with a ton of great single issues and collections that you can pick up now to read while you stand in line trying to buy a six-dollar BluRay player or make conversation with your relatives.

It should be noted that it's not on everything --- there are a couple of notable absences, including Ed Brubaker and Steve Epting's Velvet, for instance --- but there's more than enough there to get going, and as always, we've got some recommendations!

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The X-Files Cold Cases, #1: ‘One Player Only’


From 1995 to 1998, Topps Comics published a comics tie-in to The X-Files that featured original stories and, among other artists, some of Charlie Adlard's earliest US art. With Agents Fox Mulder and Dana Scully returning to television in January, we're revisiting this classic series and highlighting some of the best stories it had to tell, starting with The X-Files #13: 'One Player Only'.

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ICYMI: We Found Out What the #LipstickIncident Was In ‘Archie’ #4


Since the first issue of the new Archie comic, one of the driving forces behind the plot was the recent breakup between Archie Andrews and Betty Cooper, paving the way for Veronica Lodge to wrap Archie around her finger like a freckled piece of string. The impetus behind the breakup was "the lipstick incident," which was describned specifically as Archie not cheating on Betty – leaving everyone to ask, "what exactly happened?"

Archie #4, by Mark Waid and Annie Wu, answers the question.

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Filed Under: , , , Category: Archie, Reviews

‘Silk’ #1 Remembers The Past While Looking Towards The Future [Review]


Silk, the wall-crawling hero with slightly less baggage than the other spider-people in the Marvel Universe, gets a new #1 this week in the relaunch (that's really a continutation) of her solo series. It's a first issue that finds its strongest and weakest moments in how it handles the status quo.

Marvel has done a great job in recent years of finding excellent artists whose styles wouldn't normally fit in a Big Two superhero book, and Stacey Lee's art on Silk is no exception. Her art has a gentle roundness to it, with a natural sense of animation, and strong character designs. Lee stuffs her panels with character details that round out the characters presented without needlessly distracting the eye.

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A Nerd and Her Dinosaur: Moon Girl is the Hero We Need [Review]

moongirl feat

The first issue of Moon Girl and Devil Dinosaur is a perfect introduction to Moon Girl, whose given name is Lunella Lafayette. Lunella is a nerd. Like, a big nerd. She’s the sort of kid who hates school because it doesn’t challenge her, and the other kids make fun of her for knowing so much. She’s the sort of kid who wears a T-shirt with a realistic picture of the moon on it (which is also a nice meta-joke about the idea of “Moon Girl” as a conventional superhero identity).

Basically, Moon Girl is exactly the sort of kid who reads comics. Or at least, she’s the sort of kid who reads comics if kids still read comics. And Moon Girl and Devil Dinosaur is the sort of comic (along with books like Squirrel Girl and Lumberjanes) that gives me hope that kids reading comics might still be a thing, or could become a thing again. At least there are comics we can feel good about handing them to keep that hope alive.

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The Delinquents: A Beginner’s Guide to ‘Harbinger’


Valiant Comics‘ shared superhero universe is smaller and less familiar than those of its major rivals, but even a small shared universe can offer a lot to learn about. To help those readers looking to take the plunge into the Valiant Universe, we’ve assembled our own team of delinquents to break things down. Steve Morris knows Valiant inside out; J.A. Micheline is new to the universe. Micheline has the questions, and Morris has the answers.

Last time, Steve introduced JAM to the first sixteen issues of horror series Shadowman and supernatural romance The Death-Defying Doctor Mirage. For the next assignment, he set JAM homework of the first two volumes of the superpowered team-book Harbinger, one of the flagship titles of the Valiant Universe — and now they’re back to talk about it!

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Two Tickets for the Apocalypse Please: Should You Be Reading ‘Back’?


Back is a supernatural/western webcomic by Anthony Clark of Nedroid Picture Diary and KC Green of Gunshow. Together, these cartoonists have created an eerie world with a lot of secrets and unanswered questions.

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Meet The Many Jane Mais of Jane Mai’s ‘See You Next Tuesday’


One of the first pages of cartoonist Jane Mai's See You Next Tuesday is simply a large drawing of the girl on the cover winking, with the words "This is my diary, xoxo Jane Mai" next to it. That certainly seems to suggest that the many short comics, drawings and bursts of hand-written text should be read as autobiographical; as real or true. But that page is followed almost immediately by qualifiers.

The first is a hand-written page stating that "The following series of events is not presented chronologically and frankly time does not exist anyway. I'm not even sure I exist TBH." And that is followed by a two-page "people guide" introducing the dramatis personae that star in the book, and... four of the seven are different versions of Jane Mai.

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