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Preacher Ma’am: How Does ‘Salvation’ Hold Up Today?

PreacherMaam-Salvation

In this installment, Preacher faces controversy, and not for the usual reasons – but rather, because everyone argues over whether this arc truly serves the story. Salvation, by Garth Ennis and Steve Dillon, with colors by Pamela Rambo and letters by Clem Robbins, is often considered the runt of the Preacher litter of trade paperbacks. Is it a misstep for the series, a needed divergence, or something else entirely?

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Preacher Ma’am: How Does ‘War in the Sun’ Hold Up Today?

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In War In The Sun, written by Garth Ennis and illustrated by Steve Dillon and Peter Snejbjerg, everything changes forever. It's a promise that means nothing in most comics, but when Preacher says it, it follows all the way through. While Preacher is a lot like a superhero comic, it has one key difference: things change, and change greatly, and stay changed.

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Down the Cracks of the DC Universe with Garth Ennis and Russ Braun in ‘Sixpack & Dogwelder: Hard Travelin’ Heroz’ [Interview]

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It’s not easy being a superhero. Your allies all talk in catchphrases, your best friend is into dog-on-person action, and racism still hasn’t been solved despite Green Lantern and Green Arrow giving it their best shot.

But hope springs eternal, and now the DC Universe’s most... somethingest heroes are stepping up to the plate in the Hitman spinoff mini series Sixpack & Dogwelder: Hard Travelin' Heroz. ComicsAlliance spoke with artist Russ Braun and writer Garth Ennis about what to expect from this latest return to the grungier side of superheroism.

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Falling Off the Whiz Wagon: ‘All-Star Section Eight’s’ Journey Through Addiction

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When Garth Ennis and John McCrea's Hitman ended, it ended definitively for almost all of its characters --- including the collection of heroes called Section 8, who would have to sweat for a lifetime to reach the lofty heights of the Z-list. So I held off on buying All-Star Section 8 --- written by Ennis, drawn by McCrea, with colors by John Kalisz, letters by Pat Brosseau and covers by Amanda Conner and Paul Mounts --- because I didn’t feel the need to revisit it.

But eventually I did, and I was not expecting what I got: affection wrapped in sheer nihilism, a pointed critique from a very unexpected angle on how the Big Two superhero universes work, and nothing less than Ennis and McCrea’s own Flex Mentallo.

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Preacher Ma’am: How Does ‘Dixie Fried’ Hold Up Today?

PreacherMaam-DixieFried

As someone who thought she was a dude in the late 1990s, Preacher was the comic I looked forward to every month more than any other. As someone who knows she isn’t a dude in the mid-2010s, I’m looking back on this series and examining what still works, what doesn’t work, and what its lasting legacy is.

In Dixie Fried the cast starts to settle into a routine, and one of the greatest strengths of the series comes to the fore, even as characters turn out to be not what they seem and the series’ perspective on religion turns out to be more nuanced than expected. Dixie Fried was written by Garth Ennis, drawn by Steve Dillon, and features colors by Matt Hollingsworth, Pamela Rambo, and James Sinclair, letters by Clem Robbins, and was edited by Axel Alonso.

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ICYMI: ‘Superman’ #4 Features Rebirth’s Most Surprising Return Yet

Superman #4, DC Comics

When it comes to the Superman books, we are living in an age of terrifying uncertainty. Like, seriously, I have read every single Superman comic that has come out since DC's latest relaunch, and right about the time the Eradicator showed up to fight Post-Crisis Superman because New 52 Superman was dead, I had to admit that I had no idea how we got here. But with all that uncertainty comes a thrill of excitement, and this week, Superman #4 gave us not one, but two surprising returns, courtesy of Peter J. Tomasi and Patrick Gleason.

The first one is actually not all that unexpected: It's Bibbo Bibbowski,the lottery-winning former heavyweight champ best known for being Superman's #1 fan. Considering that he was a staple of Superman's supporting cast in the '90s, his appearance isn't exactly shocking. The guy he's arm-wrestling, though? That one's a surprise.

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Preacher Ma’am: How Does ‘Ancient History’ Hold Up Today?

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As someone who thought she was a dude in the late 1990s, Preacher was the comic I looked forward to every month more than any other. As someone who knows she isn’t a dude in the mid-2010s, I’m looking back on this series and examining what still works, what doesn’t work, and what its lasting legacy is.

This week, it's a break from the regular series as writer Garth Ennis and editor Julie Rottenberg assemble a series of one-shots set in the Preacher expanded universe. What will different artistic styles bring to the table, and what can the tone of each one --- from frivolous to a serious as a tombstone --- tell us about how well fiction ages?

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Preacher Ma’am: How Does ‘Proud Americans’ Hold Up Today?

PreacherMaam-ProudAmericans

As someone who thought she was a dude in the late 1990s, Preacher was the comic I looked forward to every month more than any other. As someone who knows she isn’t a dude in the mid-2010s, I’m looking back on this series and examining what still works, what doesn’t work, and what its lasting legacy is.

This week, we look at the stories collected in the third volume, Proud Americans, courtesy of writer Garth Ennis and artist Steve Dillon, colorist Matt Hollingsworth, letterer Clem Robbins, and editor Axel Alonso, with covers by Glenn Fabry. These stories are all thematically tied together by reconciling what seems to be with the way things are --- the myth versus the reality --- although in one case, we may not know it yet…

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Preacher Ma’am: How Does ‘Until the End of the World’ Hold Up Today?

PreacherMaam-GTT

As someone who thought she was a dude in the late 1990s, Preacher was the comic I looked forward to every month more than any other. As someone who knows she isn’t a dude in the mid-2010s, I’m looking back on this series and examining what still works, what doesn’t work, and what its lasting legacy is.

If Gone to Texas was the fizzle, Until the End of the World is the bang. The second collection, by Garth Ennis and Steve Dillon, with colors by Matt Hollingsworth, letters by Clem Robbins, and covers by Glenn Fabry, includes issues #8 through #17, and it's where Preacher truly takes off for me, all because of the lead-in story, which gives the collection its title.

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Preacher Ma’am: How Does ‘Gone to Texas’ Hold Up Today?

PreacherMaam-GTT

As someone who thought she was a dude in the late 1990s, Preacher was the comic I looked forward to every month more than any other. As someone who knows she isn’t a dude in the mid-2010s, I’m looking back on this series and examining what still works, what doesn’t work, and what its lasting legacy is.

Created by Garth Ennis and Steve Dillon, with colors by Matt Hollingsworth, letters by Clem Robbins, and covers by Glenn Fabry, Preacher launched in 1995 from Vertigo. The first trade paperback, Gone To Texas, was published in 1996. The series is now being adapted for the screen as a TV series on AMC, and it was the moment that Jesse Custer pulled out a cellphone in the Preacher pilot that I realized that the mid-'90s were a long time ago.

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