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Gerry Conway

Bizarro Back Issues: Colonel Blimp’s Extremely Improbable Reign Of Terror (1982)

Detective Comics #519, DC Comics

I think we can all agree that the single biggest piece of news in comics right now is the shocking return of Colonel Blimp in the pages of Tom King and Ivan Reis's Batman #6, in stores now.

But just who is Colonel Blimp? Well, if you read that issue, you already know that he's got a blimp and steals submarines, and really, that's kind of all there is to it.

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Hitting The Jackpot: A Celebration Of Mary Jane Watson

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On this day in 1966, Peter Parker was confronted with the eight iconic words that would change his life forever, as Stan Lee and John Romita finally introduced Mary Jane Watson as a supporting character in The Amazing Spider-Man. Whether it’s as wife, confidante, or a take no prisoners model/actress/nightclub owner, Mary Jane has been one of the most enduring and important supporting characters in comics for half a century.

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Marvel NOW Line-Up Leaks Online Confirming New Series For ‘Solo’, ‘Foolkiller’, ‘Prowler’ And More

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Marvel’s reveal of its Marvel NOW line of comics set for release in the wake of Civil War II has taken the form of a steady drip of announcements over the past week and a half, but now news is flooding in, and not all from official sources. Leaked scans of this week's Marvel NOW Previews magazine revealing the publisher's line-up for October and beyond have hit the internet via sites such as Reddit and 4chan.

We’ve rounded up all the information we could find to give you a sense of the new landscape of the Marvel Universe this fall.

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The Lasting Impact Of ‘The Night Gwen Stacy Died’

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Decades after its release on March 13 1973, The Amazing Spider-Man #121 by Gerry Conway, Gil Kane, John Romita and Tony Mortellaro remains one of the most affecting, heartbreaking superhero comics to see publication. What starts off as a traditional superhero versus supervillain battle over the fate of the hero’s love interest takes a tragic turn when Gwen Stacy dies despite the hero's best efforts to save her --- and in that moment, superhero comics grew up in a major way.

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Living the Teenage Dream: A Birthday Tribute To Gerry Conway

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At 19 years old, Gerry Conway --- born this day in 1952 --- took over writing duties on The Amazing Spider-Man. If that wasn't enough pressure for a kid, know that he took over from Stan Lee, who co-created the character and wrote over a hundred issues. Within a year of taking over on the book, Conway wrote the death of Gwen Stacy, one of the major turning points in the history of superhero comics.

If you were looking for the most auspicious start to a writing career, you'd have a hard time finding a bigger and better one than that. What's amazing is that Conway managed to live up to the standard he set for himself, carving out one of the most influential careers in comics history.

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51 Years Ago Today: Zatanna Made Her Magical Debut

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Debuting in the pages of Hawkman #4 by Murphy Anderson and Gardner Fox this week in 1964, Zatanna is a magician in a science fiction world; a magic user in a shared universe built upon Superman's otherworldly power and Batman's human ingenuity. She is both a “real” magician and a performance magician, as much at home with a genuine mind-wipe as she is with a dove up her sleeve.

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The Evolution of Shazam: Best Captain Marvel Stories by Decade

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Many of comics’ most popular heroes have been around for decades, and in the case of the big names from the publisher now known as DC Comics, some have been around for a sizable chunk of a century. As these characters passed through the different historical eras known in comics as the Golden Age (the late 1930s through the early 1950s), the Silver Age (the mid 1950s through the late 1960s), the Bronze Age (the early 1970s through the mid 1980s) and on into modern times, they have experienced considerable changes in tone and portrayal that reflect the zeitgeist of the time.

With this feature we’ll help you navigate the very best stories of DC Comics’ most beloved characters decade by decade. This week, we’re taking a look at the best Captain Marvel comics.

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Who Owns Power Girl? On Ownership, Gerry Conway, and DC Entertainment’s Royalty System

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Writer Gerry Conway, who created several characters during his time at both Marvel and DC (including Firestorm, Killer Croc, Vixen and The Punisher) took to his blog recently to discuss and throw a spotlight on the way DC pay credit to their creative talent for the characters they created while working for the company.

By introducing what they call ‘creator equity participation’, DC was one of the first publishers to offer royalty payments to creators for when characters were used outside of the comics medium --- such as in television, cinema, toys, or video games. Chuck Dixon, for example, is paid whenever Bane appears in a film or video game, as he is cited as the character’s co-creator.

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Cinder And Ashe: José Luis García-López’s Nearly Overlooked Masterwork

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Originally published by DC Comics in 1988, Cinder and Ashe is a comic by Gerry Conway, José Luis García-López, and Joe Orlando about two mercenary/detective friends who are unable to escape and reconcile with the horrors of their shared past in Vietnam -- a past which has become actualized with the returning of a mad killer who they both thought was long dead. The story takes place in New Orleans with flashbacks to Vietnam, and some stops in Washington, DC and Iowa.

Now available in a collected edition, the book is a well preserved testament to the artistry of one of comics' best storytellers.

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Here’s The Thing, Episode 21: A Brief History Of Firestorm [Video]

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If our weekly Ask Chris column isn't enough of definitive comic book (and pro wrestling) opinions for you, good news: ComicsAlliance is proud to present Here's The Thing, a series of videos where you can join our own extremely opinionated senior writer, Chris Sims, as he dives into comics history to explain why you're wrong and he's right.

This week, a few viewers write in to ask about the history of Firestorm, a relatively obscure DC Comics character who was most prominent in the 1980s. As you may already know, obscure DC characters from the '80s are Chris's entire jam, which sends him on a long explanation of who Firestorm is and how he came to be, from the DC Implosion to Brave and the Bold.

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Filed Under: , , Category: DC, Opinion, Video

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