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Ms. Marvel: Alienation, Exhilaration, And The Beating Heart Of Superhero Comics

Jamie McKelvie
Jamie McKelvie

I was excited for Ms. Marvel from the moment it was announced. I reblogged it, retweeted it, called my mother about it, chatted it up at my local comic shop. But secretly, I was more than a little certain that it would suck in all the usual ways. Sure, the cover was splashy, and sure, I was hearing good things about G. Willow Wilson. But I was girded for — and expected — twenty or so lackluster issues before cancellation.

The first issue came out, and it was good. Really good. It was bright and fun and electric with personality in every way a comic can be, from its color palette to its ending splash. Still, though, I was unconvinced — fantastic first issues have given way to mediocrity before.

But the second issue was great. And the third. And the fourth. And with the fifth issue and the first arc completed, I feel that I can finally let out the breath I've been holding and say that Ms. Marvel is truly wonderful work.

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‘Ms. Marvel’ #1: Embracing The Paradox [Review]

Ms Marvel 2014 review

James Baldwin once described America as a "country devoted to the death of the paradox." He was right, of course. We're more comfortable seeing things in extremes, in black and white. A person from one culture or background can be instantly labeled as an upstanding citizen, exemplifying everything good about "real America." Superman is from Kansas, not San Francisco.

But if you're from another background, you can be instantly labeled as something else entirely: lazy, entitled, a thug, "Un-American." To many, there are those who fit into a certain label based on where they grew up, what school they went to, what church they attend. To think otherwise, to consider that there is more to us than blanket, largely basely assumptions, isn't as easy. And for many, it's too uncomfortable. It's too much work.

Ms. Marvel #1 stands in stark contrast to that sentiment. Written by G. Willow Wilson and illustrated by Adrian Alphona, each major character introduced in this first issue is a celebration and exploration of the paradox. It is a book full of characters who remind you of people you know, or people you knew. It's a book that's unique, but nonetheless familiar. It is also, by almost any measure, one of the best first issues of a superhero comic in years. And, if we're being honest, it probably needed to be.

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The ‘Ms. Marvel’ Tumblr: An Inside Look At One Of The Most Important Books Of The Year

Ms. Marvel #1

Next month Marvel will release the much anticipated Ms. Marvel #1, the new series from creators G. Willow Wilson and Adrian Alphona, and edited by Sana Amanat. It is a rarity in the industry: you can practically count on one hand the number of titles published at Marvel and DC combined that have starred a woman of color. Further, the new Ms. Marvel -- Kamala Khan -- is a Muslim Pakistani-American teenager, the first Muslim character to star in a monthly solo series at Marvel. As such, the title has received significant attention, and rightfully so; it's obviously early in the year, but it's no stretch to say that this may be the most important comic published in 2014.

And if not the most important, so far I'd say it's the most anticipated. Before the first issue has even hit stands, it has already received the type of media attention seldom afforded a super hero comic, and that type of attention breeds curiosity. With that in mind, Amanat has set up the Ms. Marvel tumblr, which gives people looking forward to the title a peek behind the curtain at the process of putting the book together, as well as explaining a few things you may have missed.

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Marvel Unveils New Ms. Marvel: A Muslim Pakistani-American Teenager

Ms. Marvel G Willow Wilson Marvel Now Muslim Teen

The New York Times broke news today of a new solo superhero title launching from Marvel early next year -- and this one comes as a welcome change of pace for readers who want to see more diversity in their super-books.

Ms Marvel #1, from writer G. Willow Wilson (Cairo) and artist Adrian Alphona (Runaways), introduces the world to the young Muslim woman who takes on the mantle of Ms. Marvel formerly held by Carol Danvers, the current Captain Marvel. The new Ms. Marvel will be the first Muslim character to get her own ongoing solo series at Marvel, one of a growing number of female solo leads, and the only person of color headlining a solo book in the Marvel Universe.

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The ‘Women Of Marvel’ Panel: The Antidote To Corporate Comic Con Buzz [NYCC 2012]

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I've been to a lot of Marvel Comics conventions panels this year. Only three major conventions -- San Diego's Comic-Con Internation, Toronto's Fan Expo, and the New York Comic Con -- but a lot of Marvel panels

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Peter Parker & Miles Morales to Meet in Bendis & Pichelli’s ‘Spider-Men’

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Following a short series of teasers, Marvel confirmed Wednesday that the curious "Spider-Men" project would as predicted take the form of a story in which Peter Parker, the classic Spider-Man of the publisher's main line, teams-up with Miles Morales, the recently introduced Spider-Man of the publisher's distinct Ultimate Comics Universe. Written by Brian Michael Bendis and drawn by Sara Pichelli with color by Justin Ponsor, the five-part Spider-Men miniseries marks the first such crossover

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Marvel Ultimate Comics Universe Reborn Panel [NYCC 2011]

nyccultimatebooksmain

Friday at New York Comic Con, Marvel Comics welcomed readers of its Ultimate Comics line of titles to discuss those series with some of the creative talents behind them. Panelists included Arune Singh,

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