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John Romita Jr. Feels The Pressure On New ‘Superman’ Run

RomitaSupes

Influential Marvel Comics artist John Romita Jr. begins his run on Superman with writer Geoff Johns this week, and while you'd expect this would just be another notch in the incredibly accomplished artist's belt (he's drawn popular runs with virtually every major Marvel character you can think of) he's apparently pretty intimidated by the prospect of taking on the very first comic book superhero.

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Filed Under: , , Category: Art, DC, News

The United Nations Condemned Superman In The 1950s, And Believe It Or Not, They Made Some Valid Points

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When people think of the backlash against comics in the 1950s, one name often springs to mind: Fredric Wertham, the author of the 1954 book Seduction of the Innocent, which linked comic book reading to illiteracy, sexual deviancy (by his definition), violence and drug use.

While Wertham's book was certainly a catalyst for a lot of changes and censorship in comics, it wasn't the first domino that fell toward the development of the stringent Comics Code Authority. Criticism of comics had been growing to a fever pitch for years before that, and io9 has uncovered one example that came a full two years before the publication of Seduction of the Innocent: a full-on United Nations condemnation of Superman. And guess what: It isn't entirely wrong.

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Superhuman Error: What Conservatives Chuck Dixon & Paul Rivoche Get Wrong About Politics In American Comics

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Conservative comics creators Chuck Dixon and Paul Rivoche have written a piece for the Wall Street Journal titled, “How Liberalism Became Kryptonite for Superman: A graphic tale of modern comic books’ descent into moral relativism.” While beating familiar conservative drums like jingoistic nostalgia and referencing a lot of incorrect information, these two experienced pros manage to paint a picture of an industry tottering on the edge of moral collapse to an audience that knows little about what’s actually going on.

The goal here, of course, is to sell comics. By complaining to a conservative audience about how liberals have taken over the medium, Dixon and Rivoche attempt to persuade non-comics readers to buy their new book, an adaptation of Amity Shlaes' The Forgotten Man, as a bit of political activism.

Like many conservative comics fans, Dixon and Rivoche bemoan the lack of conservative comics being published today, and a perceived liberal bent of the industry, while limiting their definition of comics primarily to super hero books published by Marvel and DC. The problem is not with their politics; it’s with their misrepresentation of the industry and its history to an outside audience.

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Ask Chris #198: The Mass Media Influence On Comics Canon

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Q: Is it ever worth it to change comics canon to match the canon from other media? -- @firehawk32

A: This is a really interesting question for me, because I always think of myself as someone who doesn't really get excited about superheroes showing up in movies or TV. I mean, obviously, that's not actually true -- I mean, I cowrote what was essentially a full-length novel about The Dark Knight, Batman: The Animated Series ranks alongside oxygen and pizza as my favorite thngs in the universe, I could not have been more stoked about seeing Arnim Zola The Bio Fanatic in two major Hollywood films, and there will never be a time when I'm not still mad about Man of Steel. But at the same time, and at the risk of sounding like even more of a hipster elitist than usual, those aren't the "real" versions of those charactesr to me. I like TV and movies just fine, but when it comes to the superhero genre, I'm in it for the comics. Everything else is just a bonus.

That said, what's considered "canon" in comics changes literally all the time, and often for a lot worse reasons than because there's something out there that's resonating with a mass audience.

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‘Man Of Steel’ Sequel Will Be Called ‘Batman V Superman: Dawn of Justice’ For Some Reason

Batman V Superman Dawn of Justice
Warner Bros.

The new Man of Steel sequel, which has also been referred to widely as Batman Vs. Superman because it features both heroes in lead roles, has a title, and surprisingly, it doesn't include the words "dark," "shadows," "black," or even "knight" in it, as we had previously guessed.

Nope, this one's hilarious for entirely different reasons. Coming to theaters May 6, 2016: Batman V Superman: Dawn of Justice, directed by Zack Snyder and starring Henry Cavill and Ben Affleck.

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Ask Chris #194: Building A Better Superhero Costume

Ask Chris art by Erica Henderson

Q: What do you think is the essence of making a great iconic costume? -- @thenoirguy

A: With comics being a visual medium and all, especially one that's dominated by a genre marked by its own goofy language of symbolism and iconography, I think about superhero costumes pretty often. I mean, I cannot count the number of times I have written the words "Batman's Batman-Shaped Kneepads" over the past three years, but that said, I'll admit that I might not be the best person to answer this question. As Erica Henderson (artist of Subatomic Party Girls and the Ask Chris logo above) pointed out, I'm not an artist. Then she went ahead and answered the question, telling me that "It's pretty simple, iconic is something that's quick and easy to recognize. that's why nobody talks about Cable's costume."

Listen, Erica, I don't know what circles you run in, but I talk about Cable's costume a lot.

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‘How It Should Have Ended’ Takes On ‘The LEGO Movie’ In Stop-Motion Style [Video]

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If you saw The LEGO Movie a few months back, you may have noticed that it posits a pretty interesting world, where all of LEGO's licensed characters -- well, all the characters not currently owned by Warner Bros.' corporate rivals, anyway -- coexist as blocky little mini-figures. This is pretty cool, since it's not often that you get to see Superman, Batman, Wonder Woman, Michaelangelo, Dumbledore and Gandalf all hanging out. But it does present an interesting story problem. How exactly do you present a problem that all of those characters can't solve? Which, of course, is exactly whatThe LEGO Movie does.

The folks behind How It Should Have Ended have taken a slight bit of exception to this, and in order to address it, they've kicked out a pretty awesome two-minute stop motion animated video featuring the World's Finest. Check it out!

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ComicsAlliance Presents Here’s The Thing, Episode 4: A Brief History Of Jack Kirby’s Cadmus Institute [Video]

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If our weekly Ask Chris column isn't enough of definitive comic book (and pro wrestling) opinions for you, good news: ComicsAlliance is proud to present Here's The Thing, a series of videos where you can join our own extremely opinionated senior writer, Chris Sims, as he sits in his living room under a framed portrait of Destro, drinking a cup of coffee and sharing his opinion on comic books.

This week, Chris takes a viewer question from someone curious about Cadmus Institute, a fixture of the DC universe created by the legendary Jack Kirby that has its roots in the Golden Age and continues to operate in the background of comics all the way to the 21st Century.

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Sideshow Collectibles Shows Off Its Sixth Scale Superman, Complete With Classic Trunks

Sideshow Superman Sixth Scale Figure
Sideshow Collectibles

Sideshow Collectibles' sixth scale Batman figure is about to get some Kryptonian company. A sixth scale version of Superman is now available for preorder with an estimated January 2015 delivery date -- complete with the character's classic red trunks in tow.

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Jerry Ordway & Steve Rude’s ‘Adventures of Superman’ Is Like ‘A Lost Fleischer Cartoon’ [Interview]

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The best Superman comic book currently published is about to get even better this coming Monday with the addition of Steve Rude, arguably one of today’s best living American comic book artists, and Jerry Ordway, one of the key Superman storytellers of the '80s and '90s, and a brilliant and influential artist in his own right. The pair have collaborated on a Superman story starring OMAC, a cult favorite creation of Rude’s own hero, Jack Kirby, for an Adventures of Superman digital short that they describe as " a lost Max Fleischer Superman cartoon."

ComicsAlliance spoke with Ordway and Rude to learn more about the 10-page adventure, their impressions of Superman in this day and age, the digital comics revolution, and how these accomplished but very distinctive creators worked together on the story.

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